News

After running a full campaign Dave Baigent was re-elected as City Councillor for Romsey on Thursday 3rd May 2018.

The singlest most points raised on the doorsteps and in the streets were about the state of the roads and pavements, and speculative development that was damaging the community in Romsey and the wider city.

Roads and pavements are the responsibility of the County Council who take over 73% of our council tax, and yet seem incapable of being able to maintain our infrastructure.

Dave made a specific pledge during the campaign which was 

It is my pledge to the people of Romsey that I will fight hard to stop any more speculative student flats being developed in Romsey and to contain the speculative development of other forms of accommodation.  It may be that we have to look for new approaches that include more Romsey residents acting to get their voice heard."  

 

The results in Romsey

 

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Council Tax and how it is divided

 

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Dave's Campaign page follows

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Four year's ago Romsey elected Dave Baigent as their City Councillor and he brought a new passion to the idea of giving Romsey a voice.

"On that night in May 2014 I was so proud to be elected as City Councillor for Romsey.  Ever since then I have made it my duty to ensure that Romsey's voice is heard.  I leave no stone unturned in my efforts to see that Romsey and our City get the best possible outcomes - I am available seven day's a week and even on holiday I deal with my emails as they come in.  That is what I pledged to do and that is what I have done."

"Everything that I have done in Romsey and on the wider council is the result of belonging to a great team here in Romsey.  Without their support I am nothing."

A reminded of May 2014

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Some of the team at the Guildhall count in 2014 - 0400 on the morning after the election.

Labour win the seat in Romsey by increasing their vote by 62.5%

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Meeting Residents

Even before he was elected Dave had made his presence felt on the doorsteps and at the stalls held regularly outside the Coop.  Labour's team in Romsey has continued this approach as a great way to hear what you want to say.  From these street stalls and in our door knocking we make ourselves available to everyone in the ward.  We are out door-knocking from September through to May because we believe this is the best way that resident's voice can be heard.  We also issue regular newsletters, and Tweet and use Facebook prolifically.  Through these forms of communications we have brought politics in Romsey into people's lives. 

 

Dave is making a pledge to try new strategies for getting Romsey's voice heard.  

After the failure to stop the development of student flats at the Labour Club (and also remembering what happened at McLaren's and with the development of a number of HMO's) Dave says:

"It is my pledge to the people of Romsey that I will fight hard to stop any more speculative student flats being developed in Romsey and to contain the speculative development of other forms of accommodation.  It may be that we have to look for new approaches that include more Romsey residents acting to get their voice heard."

 

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If you want to know what Dave is thinking about on a day to day basis, then follow his twitter @dave4labour

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Dave serves on the following committees: 

  1. Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee (Vice-Chair)
  2. Cambridge City Joint Area Committee
  3. Cambridgeshire Police and Crime Panel
  4. FullCouncil
  5. Development Plan Scrutiny Sub-Committee
  6. East Area Committee
  7. Greater Cambridge Partnership Joint Assembly
  8. Greater Cambridge Partnership Smart Places Working Group
  9. Housing Scrutiny Committee
  10. Joint Development Control - Cambridge Fringes - Development Control Forum
  11. Joint Development Control Committee - Cambridge Fringes
  12. The Cambridge and Peterborough Combined Authority Scrutiny Committee
  13. The Cambridge and Peterborough Combined Authority Scrutiny Committee’s task group on Cam Metro
  14. The Cambridgeshire Community Safety Partnership
  15. The Greater Cambridge Partnership Smart Places Working Group
  16. Opening Romsey Lakes

Dave is also Lead Councillor on the Private Rental Sector 

 

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Some examples of Dave's work within the ward. 

One of the first challenges Dave took on was to open Romsey Lakes:
"I first visited Romsey Lakes soon after i had been elected. As I entered the site i could not believe what I saw.  Acres of water, with Swans, Ducks and endless amounts of wildlife opened up before me.  I had been told that there had been several efforts to open the lakes and that all had failed.  I like a challenge and even more importantly I realised that this haven just 50 yards from the busy Ring Road should rightly be available to the public. 
I set up a committee and at the first meeting I suggested we would have the lakes open in six months.  Little did I realise at that time just how many obstacles there would be.  However, standing on the shoulders of those who had gone before me, our committee started to unravel the bureaucracy and opposition to a point where the Lakes were open to unescorted visitors for the first time ever on Sunday 11th March.  But this was 2018 and not 2014.  Over 1,000 people attended and after a gap to allow the wild life to breed during April and May, the Lakes will open for a Sunday in June and once a month thereon.  This is just the beginning."
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Dave was involved in the development of, and continues to support the Edge Cafe.  To show support for the work that 'The Edge' is about, Dave recently attended an event there to celebrate an exhibition by the Cambridge Community Arts Photographers Collective. 

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Dear Dave
It was so wonderful to meet you and your wife . Thank you again for all your support and interest.  It was and is much appreciated. Your wife's comments of how welcome and comfortable she felt was so much appreciated. I passed those comments onto the Edge Cafe too.
I must add that it is my first time of having a selfie .. quite an experience.

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Romsey Labour Club

The historic building that was the Labour Club has come to symbolise Romsey's resistance to overdevelopment.  After protracted negotiations with the developer we won the first round when the planning committee rejected the proposal.  At the second hearing the developers won as councillors unanimously agreed to allow the development. Dave fought hard to support the over 100 residents who challenged the development on the planning website.  Dave says

'They are now going to bury Romsey Labour Club under 'student flats' that are designed for post-grads.  This despite Robinson College boarding up their post grad accommodation in Romsey Terrace because post grads did not want to live so far from their college.

I am lost for words. Well actually I am not but I have to be silent because I am so angry that Romsey Labour Club, a piece of social history, built by the people of Romsey is to be destroyed in order to make money for a developer. 

It is my pledge to the people of Romsey that I will fight hard to stop any more speculative student flats being developed in Romsey and to contain the speculative development of other forms of accommodation.  It may be that we have to look for new approaches that include more Romsey residents acting to get their voice heard."  

Dave's spoke at the planning committee (after Andrew Clarke who made a massive contribution about why not to allow this development) in a speech that was interrupted by the Chair who insisted that ... well you see for yourself at this video link 

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Trying to save Romsey from Developers:

The way that Romsey is being developed, even over developed, is a constant discussion point on the doorsteps with Romsey residents.  Dave is not a member of the Planning Committee, but he has, since he was elected in 2014, been the principal voice of Romsey when he has used the right of a Councillor to speak at planning meetings.  One speech often labelled by local planning activists as 'Cambridge's despair' perhaps personifies Romsey's problem when Dave was appealing to the planning committee to turn down a plan for another HMO in Madras road https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLZM7i3SXZ4&t=17s

 

"It has been an ongoing battle trying to stop overdevelopment in Romsey.  I would like to say that I have been successful but many of the attempts to stop a development at Planning Committee have been lost.  At times I despair.  I mostly meet with those planning controversial developments before plans are submitted to try to ameliorate the impact and there have been many successes.
 
However, when we get to the public committee The Government has set an expectation that permission will be granted.  This is a legal matter and councillors on the committee cannot represent a party and we are unable to whip them.  However, I do feel that Romsey's voice is heard.  As I gain experience we are getting better at presenting a case and there have been successes.  Our next big challenge is this Wednesday when we will be opposing the plans for Romsey Labour Club."
Dave presented the case for saving the Labour Club but was constantly interrupted by the chair.  You can watch the video.  This shows how Dave did his best to get the committee onside but singularly failed.  

Ridgeon's Site

After two years of negotiations, following earlier protest we managed to get an outcome that we were prepared to support. It may not have been perfect, but includes 40% social housing.   ridgeons_protest.jpg ridgeons_plan.jpg

St Philips School 

The parents at St Philip's School were almost caught of guard by the attempts to academise St Philips School.  What followed was a wonderful example of how a community can band together with politicians and prove that the voice of the ordinary woman and man still counts.  

 

st_philips.jpg "I attended the ad hoc parents meeting to challenge what appeared to be a done deal.  At that meeting we managed to get an extension to the consultation period.  I attended other meetings and helped to collect signatures for a petition at the school gates. I never believed for one moment that I was taking part in one of the best examples of people power that I have ever experienced".

Coop Frontage

Plans are agreed for a small town square outside the Coop - this will be delivered soon.

Romsey "R"

To celebrate the history of the work done by Romsey residents on the Railway, the renovation of the land at Mill Road junction of Cavendish Road will feature a bronze R.  Dave first raised this before he was elected and we have now agreed plans for this work to be completed.    IMG_6275.jpg

Chisholm Trail

Dave has provided a very real effort of support for the Chisholm Trail.  This should not be surprising as Dave is an outspoken cyclist who each day cycles up and down Mill Road. 

Supporting UCU

As a member of the Fire Brigades Union since he was 18 Dave has a keen interest in supporting the UCU in their current defence of their pensions.  Dave arranged for the Labour Group to send a letter of support to the Vice Chancellor of Cambridge University and spoke at one of their rallies.   20180315_123929.jpg

 

Children's Centres

As soon as we heard about the plans to cut children's centres we quickly arranged a meeting with Romsey Mill and we were saddened to hear just how much these cuts would affect them.

Our response was to hold a street table outside the Coop highlighting what was happening and to provide information in our newsletters to rally support.  We also contacted and met with our county colleagues who took the fight to a full County Council meeting.  The libdems also joined with Labour in the challenge to the Tories but our joint efforts did not raise enough votes to overturn the Tory majority.

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Pollution, Congestion and Parking

One part of Romsey has already agreed to become a resident parking zone.  However, this is not without its difficulties as the gain from stopping commuter parking has also resulted in the loss of some parking spaces.  When the consultation on the main part of Romsey starts then your councillors will be part of the public meetings that take place.  We will need to be very clear about the limits to parking that we are prepared to recommend to our voters.

Policing

Dave represents Cambridge on the Police Panel.  He is constantly arguing for a greater police presence throughout the City. 

There seems to be a greater awareness of drug 'dealing' going on in Romsey.  I am pursuing this with the police and the City Council's Anti Social Behaviour Team.

Taxis

Because of the work Dave has done representing Cambridge on the Policing Panel, Dave has become involved with Cambridge Taxi associations. 

 

Greater Cambridge Partnership

Dave represents Cambridge on this influential committee.  Mostly Dave is concentrating on reducing pollution in the City ...

Combined Authority

Dave represents Cambridge on the scrutiny committee for the Combined Authority.  With the help of Rod Cantrell, Dave has set up a task group that will closely scrutinise the latest suggestions for a Cam Metro and how it will tunnel under Cambridge.

Building Council Houses in Cambridge

As a member of the Housing Scrutiny Committee Dave has been closely associated with the deal to build 500 Council Houses.  Dave is vice chair of the Scrutiny Committee for Strategy and Resources and in this roll he has worked very closely with its Chair, Sophie Barnett, in questioning how these homes will be built and how the money will be found to do so.

 

LABOUR'S MANIFESTO FOR THE 2018 ELECTION

Speaking at the city centre meeting to condemn the bombing of Syria . 
https://www.facebook.com/james.youd/videos/10155229159801898/

Dave Baigent Re-Elected by an overwhelming majority

After running a full campaign Dave Baigent was re-elected as City Councillor for Romsey on Thursday 3rd May 2018. The singlest most points raised on the doorsteps and in the... Read more

May 2018

Romsey Labour have been involved in the plans for the development of Ridgeons since 2013, when we worked with a protest group that were trying to limit the amount of homes.  Dave was there, Allan Brigham, Chris Freeman and Dodie.

The group at the time was organised by Vicki and some of those children will soon be reaching voting age

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We are now waiting for whoever buys the site to start to negotiate an actual plan for the site.  The SPD is written in the form of a Planning and Development Brief to help guide the preparation and assessment of future planning applications on the Ridgeons site. As such, this document will form a material consideration, which will be taken into account by Cambridge City Council when determining any future planning application for the site.

February 2018
This site has now received outline planning permission for 245 homes as follows 
 

Proposal Outline application for erection of up 245 dwellings, including affordable housing, a nursery and/or community facility, open space, car parking, cycle parking and associated works following the demolition of all existing buildings on the site.

there is an acknowledgement within the application that there is an identified need for public open spaces in Romsey. The proposal should take every opportunity to maximise on-site provision for both informal and formal playspaces.

There is also provision for open space and the Chisholm Trail, and the provision for a nursery and or community space on site.

Currently there is off site provision for 106 donations for recreation mostly going to Abbey.

There are a number of drawings associated with the outline planning permission - they start on page 14 of the document used at the planning committee.

 

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Landscape . to see more clearly either expand the drawing or go to the reports pack

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Urban Design Parameters

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Building Heights

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Saturday 21st May 2016      Ridgeons Proposed Development Public Exhibition - 

1000 - 1500 St Phillips Church

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9-12-15  THE RIDGEONS SITE DRAFT PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BRIEF SUPPLEMENATRY PLANNING DOCUMENT is now in the public arena and being discussed by the council.  

If you follow the link and go to page 7

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Update 26-3-15

This week has seen a flurry of activity on the development brief for the Ridgeon's Site and Romsey Labour have been prominent in this activity.  In particular Ridgeon's have heeded our call for a development brief and last night we started the process by which that brief will be developed.

Overall we argued that Romsey should benefit from this development: for the site to become part of the community with access for 'all' residents of Romsey and as a means to kickstart the Chisholm Trail and a new look Cromwell Road

In no particular order we argued that: 240 + homes are too many; that we want the space to be integrated in the community and not shut off from local people; a linear park to run along the back as part of the Chisholm Trail with benches and community space and perhaps even a cafe; for a bridge to be built over the railway allowing cycle and foot access to Petersfield; access for cycles and foot to Cavendish Road; for the homes to be a mix of affordable housing and houses for sale and that any medium rise buildings to be to the rear of the site away from the conservation area; that the character of the homes to be in keeping with the local area; for car parking to be within the site and hidden under the open spaces; for Cromwell Road to be closed off from Mill Road and then the road to be re-ordered to include green space that recognises that lorries and through traffic will be a thing of the past.

Further details will be provided as they become available but be assured your Romsey Team of Zoe, Dave and Anna will work to make sure this site provides benefits for the community.

UPDATE 2-3-15:

Dates for the diary

Cambridge Labour are closely following events in regards to Ridgeons' planned development and are pleased that Ridgeons have heeded Romsey Labour's call for a development brief.

 

Ridgeon's have appointed a planning team and have come up with the following three stages of consultation. 

This first stage is very much about fact finding and exploring issues and options.  It is for consultation to then inform any draft proposals which will be worked up in the Spring.


•       Stage1 – Themes & fact finding (mid-late March) 
•       Stage 2 - Draft design principles and framework plan (early June)
•       Stage 3 – Public consultation on draft SPD (early Sept)

Note that after Stage 3 the final version of the document (taking into account formal comment) cannot be adopted by the City Council until such time as the Local Plan has been adopted as the development brief effectively "hangs off" the Local Plan.

Stage 1 will be undertaken by PTE Architects (with support from Carter Jonas and GL Hearn) on behalf of Ridgeons, and with input from officers from the City Council.  Phase 1 will have three streams of activity:

•       Public exhibition and feedback on a handful of key themes through an interactive ‘post-it-note’ approach – Sat 21 March (time TBC between 10am and 4pm) at Ross Street Community Centre 
•       Residents/ community groups workshop on the same key themes – 23 March (7pm until 9pm, Wed 25 Mar) at Ross Street Community Centre (provisionally booked)
•       Online consultation in relation to the same key themes and to include an online feedback mechanism

Stage 2 will follow the same three-streams format as stage 1 but further details on approach will follow.
Stage 3 will be a six week consultation undertaken by Cambridge City Council.

GL Hearn are Ridgeon's communication consultants and are leading on the consultation, with input from council officers.  Consultation notices will be going out shortly and I will be updating local residents via EMRAG initially and GL Hearn are putting together consultation information as we speak.  GL Hearn are experienced working in Cambridge and fully aware of concerns raised by residents through the draft Local Plan process, including concerns over site density, traffic, design and other matters.  The development brief needs to fully address these concerns and engage residents in a meaningful and constructive way.
:)

dave

 

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UPDATE  December 2014

Romsey Labour Councillors Zoe and Dave support Anna Smith's view that theRE should be a development brief for the Ridgeons site. 

 

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Previously

As part of our ongoing protest against the way the previous administration handled the planning issue at Ridgeons, Dave took advantage of the opportunity for members of the public to speak at the council meeting on Thursdays.  Dave started by challenging the proposal to overdevelop the site by allowing 245 'units' of accommodation on the Ridgeons site. Dave also asked if the Ridgeons development would open up onto Cavendish Road and the LibDems did nothing to re-assure Dave or the residents that this would not happen.  

Instead they tried to salvage a position whereby they are at odds with their residents by a last minute inclusion of a clause requiring site promoters to produce a development brief and demonstrate integration with the existing area was.  This is too little too late and the same goes for the suggestion about testing of vehicle access.  We should have started from a position where these restrictions were considered in the plan.  By accepting 75 dwellings per hectare on the site the council have left residents to appeal to the inspector.  

That is not what should happen - a council should represent their residents not suggest an open ended plan and then leave us to fight at the inspector and final planning stage.  The LibDem fudge with an amendment that meant nothing - playing politics with a problems that could have be dealt before the plans went to the inspector.  The council's approach puts the residents on the back foot - when the plans get to the inspector we should not be fighting uphill against a LibDem recommendation!  Far better that the council accepted a reduction in the amount of dwellings allowed and sorted out a preferred access and left it to the developer to challenge rather than the other way around

Democracy and Localism are meaningless when councils take this approach to their constituents - so to is the concept that you elect a councillor to represent you!

It's not as if it were a few people moaning there were over 500 people who signed the petition and over 80 made formal individual objections to the plan.

Labour Councillor Zoe Moghadas also spoke against the overdevelopment.  

The plan was passed and now we have to plan how we can challenge it at the inspector level. The overdevelopment and access to the site at Ridgeons is something that Romsey Labour have given a real profile to.  We will continue to act against the lack of democracy in allowing this into the draft plan so far we have delivered leaflets, collected signatures, got an undertaking from the Labour Party, spoken at Council and East Area.  

Ridgeons now has permission

May 2018 Romsey Labour have been involved in the plans for the development of Ridgeons since 2013, when we worked with a protest group that were trying to limit the... Read more

Anti-semitism and the Labour Party (1) - Jeremy Corbyn’s statement

 

Our Party was founded on the principles of solidarity and equality. We are proudly anti-racist, and at our best when we work together, uniting people in hope and against fear and division.

This week, Jewish leaders wrote to me to express their anger and upset about antisemitism in the Labour Party.

I want to assure you that prejudice against, and harassment of, Jewish people have no place whatsoever in our Party.

It's important to develop a deeper understanding of what constitutes antisemitism.

Often it takes familiar forms, but newer forms of antisemitism have also appeared, sometimes woven into criticisms of the actions of Israeli governments.

Criticism of Israel, and support for the rights of the Palestinians, is entirely legitimate. Support for justice for the Palestinian people should provide no one with the excuse to insult, harass or encourage hatred of Jewish people.

And abuse and personal attacks of any kind, on social media or in person, are never acceptable.

I am committed to ensuring our Party is a welcoming and secure place for everyone. I offer all Jewish members my assurance that this applies equally to them. I want all of us to hear Jewish voices and listen.

If you are not Jewish, I want you to better understand the importance of this issue and what we can do together to ensure our Party remains true to our values.

Zero tolerance for antisemitism means what it says. We will not accept it.

We have to get this right, all of us. Because divided societies cannot achieve justice.

As we head into elections in May and look towards the next General Election whenever it might come, let's take the lead in building a society free from prejudice. One that enables everyone to realise their full potential, and cares for all.

Thank you for supporting Labour.

Jeremy Corbyn

Leader of the Labour Party 

 

Anti-semitism and the Labour Party (2) - Jeremy Corbyn confirms that he is still looking to meet with the Jewish organisations that have criticised his handling of anti-semitism in the Labour Party.

Responding to a letter from the Jewish Leadership Council and Board of Deputies, Jeremy Corbyn reaffirms his determination to “address the anguish and distress caused to many people in the Jewish community”.

He accepts a “responsibility to give a strong and continuing personal lead” in the fight against antisemitism within the party and more broadly.

Corbyn goes on to confirm that he is seeking an “early” meeting with the Jewish Leadership Council and Board of Deputies to address the concerns expressed by parts of the Jewish community.

The Labour leader suggests that new general secretary Jennie Formby would “value being part of such a meeting”, and says he would place “no limitations” on the topics discussed.

This is the full text of Corbyn’s letter to the Jewish Leadership Council and Board of Deputies.

 

Dear Jonathan and Jonathan,

Thank you for your reply to my letter of March 26.

Let me straight away reaffirm that I appreciate and understand the anger you express, and reiterate my determination to fight antisemitism within the Labour Party and society at large.  As Leader of this Party, I accept my responsibility to give a strong and continuing personal lead in this fight and – along with the General Secretary – I recommit to doing all I can to address the anguish and distress caused to many people in the Jewish community.

As I said in my reply to your initial letter, I would welcome an early meeting with your organisations to discuss the issues that you have raised.  I am a strong believer that engaging in meaningful dialogue is crucial to finding effective solutions and resolving disputes and I am clear that such a meeting would be just the start of a fruitful ongoing exchange on eradicating antisemitic behaviour and discourse within the Labour Party.

It is my belief that such a meeting could easily be held without any preconditions, given that we are all on the same side as the essentials of the matter.  In any event, my door will remain open to all Jewish organisations to discuss how to deepen our cooperation in the fight against antisemitism.

My offer to meet you unconditionally still stands.  I place no limitations on the points you would wish to raise and am happy for the agenda to cover the issues you’ve already outlined.  Our new general secretary Jennie Formby takes office today, and would value being part of such a meeting, as she will be taking immediate action to address many of the concerns raised around disciplinary cases.

I recognise the full legitimacy of raising concerns about antisemitism whether that is done by MPs or ordinary party members.  I remain resolutely opposed to the abuse of MPs, or anyone else.  While local Labour parties benefit from discussing current political concerns, such discussions should always take the form of comradely dialogue on understanding and compassion and should never be a forum for threats, intimidation or abuse.

Allow me to conclude by expressing once more my desire to cooperate with your two organisations in a spirit of partnership and goodwill to address the concerns of Jewish people in Britain, who will always be a cherished part of the labour movement and our wider national community.

Best wishes,

Jeremy Corbyn

Leader of the Labour Party

 

Anti-semitism and the Labour Party (3) - Jeremy Corbyn celebrated Passover with us. It’s a simple good news story, say Jewdas

Jeremy Corbyn’s Passover meal has aroused much interest, some of it ill-informed.  Two days ago, the Guardian Online carried this explanation of what they are about by the organisers, Jewdas.  As it hasn’t so far appeared in print, we thought Camaraderie readers might be interested to learn more.

As a radical Jewish collective, we were delighted Corbyn came to our seder.  To claim we are not ‘real’ Jews is offensive and antisemiticWe are a group of British Jews who are deeply proud of being Jewish.  We have always put humour and satire at the heart of what we do – because, frankly, politics and religion are far too dull otherwise.  But don’t be mistaken: we are completely serious about what we do.

Since 2005, we have attempted to build a community based around activist, socialist and diasporist Judaism in the UK.  While most of us are also active in our local synagogues and other Jewish cultural organisations, only together have we felt able to build the kind of freethinking, traditionally radical Judaism that is needed in the 21st century.

Over those 13 years we have held many events.  We have hosted Rootless Cosmopolitan Yeshivas, and Jewish study nights, where participants learn about Talmud, philosophy, and Jewish poetry.  We organised the East London Sukkah – a week-long festival in Hackney City Farm, packed with music, film and interfaith events.  We coordinated a film festival at the Rio Cinema in Dalston, showcasing a documentary about the long tradition of Jewish socialist and anarchist activism.

We organised a concert of classical Judeo-Arabic music in a synagogue, harking back to a rich tradition of Jewish-Islamic co-operation.  We have regularly called out, condemned and marched against neo-fascists, such as when far-right groups attempted to demonstrate in Stamford Hill and Golders Green.  We have regularly spoken out against antisemitism on both the right and the left. We organise Friday night dinners, festival gatherings and community celebrations.

We created the organisation Babel’s Blessing – a radical language school that teaches diaspora languages and uses the profits to offer free English classes to migrants in the UK.  And we have organised a large number of life-affirming and deeply Jewish parties attended by hundreds of young Jews and their friends – from the legendary Punk Purim in 2005, to our most recent Purim Queer Cabaret, only a month ago.

Many young Jews have told us that without our activities they would have left Judaism altogether, dismayed by strands in the Jewish world which grow ever more rightwing, closed-minded, and nationalistic.

We are one chain in a long historical tradition of radical Judaism, both in Britain and abroad.  We particularly celebrate the heritage of the Jewish Labour Bund, the great Jewish socialist organisation that had a huge following in Russia and eastern Europe in the first half of the 20th century.  Last night we paid tribute to an old Bundist friend – Chaim Neslen – who died only days ago.  We hope to uphold the traditions that Chaim and others built. 

One event that we organise every year is a Passover seder, demonstrating the importance this Jewish holiday has for all of us.  We have always tried to blend traditional rituals with radical commentaries, following the traditions and practices of progressive Jews for well over 100 years.  A socialist understanding of the seder is deeply in keeping with the traditional texts that we read, particularly the famous Aramaic declaration Ha Lachma Anya: “This is the bread of oppression that our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt.  Let all who are hungry come and eat, let all who are in need come and share our Passover”.

Initially small-scale private events, these have grown every year as more people wanted to come, attracted by the joyful atmosphere, warm community and serious religious and cultural reflection.  Around 100 people attended this year, almost all of them Jewish.

When this year a friend and constituent of Jeremy Corbyn invited him to attend, he accepted the invitation.  He came, bringing horseradish from his own allotment for use on the communal seder plate (the horseradish symbolises the bitterness the Israelites experienced as slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt).  He sat attentively through a four-hour event, agreeing gamely to read the Elijah’s cup section when asked.  He participated fully, and chatted afterwards to many attendees.  We were very happy to have him as a guest, and he was happy to join us.

In a normal situation, you might think that the leader of the opposition attending a seder with a group of 100 young, committed Jews might be a simple good news story.  But if you’re determined to brand Jeremy Corbyn an antisemite, it seems that literally any story will do.

We have grown used to being smeared as self-hating Jews.  But labelling us a source of “virulent antisemitism” as the Board of Deputies leader, Jonathan Arkush, did today is seriously scraping the barrel.  The truth is, we love Judaism and Jewish culture, as every one of our events demonstrates.

The idea that there is a “mainstream Jewish community” is a fiction, promoted by a group of self-selecting individuals and institutions who have run out of ideas.  There are approximately 300,000 Jews in Britain, with a huge diversity of religious and political ideas represented among them.

No single organisation can speak for us all.  To claim that we in Jewdas are somehow not real Jews is offensive, and frankly antisemitic.  Chag Sameach to everyone – wishing you all a happy Passover.  May we use this festival to liberate ourselves from all oppression and stand up for justice everywhere.

Extracted from Guardian Online 3rd April 2018.  Jewdas is a radical Jewish collective based in the UK

Jeremy Corbyn on Anti-Semitism

Anti-semitism and the Labour Party (1) - Jeremy Corbyn’s statement   Our Party was founded on the principles of solidarity and equality. We are proudly anti-racist, and at our best...

16 March, 2018. NEW MONEY FOR INITIATIVES TO TACKLE POVERTY

 

CAMBRIDGE city councillors have given the green light to £305,000 funding for eight projects aimed at improving the lives of Cambridge residents who are hardest hit by the high cost of living.

The money is being allocated to the eight schemes from the council’s Sharing Prosperity Fund, which was set up to pay for initiatives that fall within the scope of its Anti-Poverty Strategy.

Since 2014, a total of £1,329,000 has been allocated to 25 projects aimed at tackling poverty in Cambridge as part of the strategy.

The initiatives that will benefit from future funding are:

Cambridge Street Aid (£14,292 in 2018-19)

The money will pay for a new part-time coordinator to recruit and train a team of volunteers to extend this programme of support for people sleeping rough. Street Aid has already raised more than £25,000 in public donations which is being used to provide grants for people sleeping rough, enabling them to take part in training, employment and wellbeing activities.

Fuel and Water Poverty Officer (£40,000 in 2018-19)

The council’s Fuel and Water Poverty Officer has made over 220 home visits since April 2015, advising residents about energy and water efficiency, with more than 286 residents taking up energy or water saving measures, saving residents an estimated £174,000 from their annual bills. The £40,000 allocation will be used to cover the cost of the existing post.

Digital Access Programme (£112,000 from 2018 to 2020)

An existing digital access programme is in place that is geared to increasing access to the internet and boosting basic digital skills for low income residents. This funding will support continued activity by the council, Cambridge Online and other partners.

Universal Credit Outreach (£78,000 from 2018 to 2020)

A new skilled financial advisor will be funded at Job Centre Plus to support households impacted by the rollout of full service Universal Credit from October. The Cambridge Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) advisor will work for up to five hours per day, five days per week to help people maximise their incomes, reduce outgoings and provide other financial support.

Outreach advice project in health centres and other settings (£35,000 in 2018-19)

The money will help to pay for a full time generalist advisor at Cambridge CAB working to support people who present with mental health problems resulting from debt, employment and other welfare rights matters.

Living Wage campaign and engaging businesses in poverty (£20,000 in 2018-19)

Since November 2014 the council has funded a part-time officer to promote the Real Living Wage, providing direct support to half of the 56 employers in Cambridge now accredited with the Living Wage Foundation. This funding will pay for the continuation of the existing post.

Active in Cambridge (£30,000 in 2018-19)

Money will be used to continue the existing programme of affordable and accessible physical exercise opportunities for residents with the greatest financial or health needs. These include subsidised or free swimming, a free exercise referral service that will be extended to four new GP surgeries and expanding the Street Games weekly sessions for young people aged 11 to 24 to King’s Hedges and Trumpington (in addition to Arbury).

 Cambridgeshire Culture Card pilot (£30,000 in 2018-19)

The Culture Card pilot aims to increase participation in arts activities by children and young people, particularly those from low income families.

This funding will pay for prototype testing of the card with around 60 young people in Trumpington Community College and their parents.

 

Cllr Richard Johnson, Executive Councillor for Communities, said:

“I am pleased these excellent initiatives will get the funding they need to continue helping local people.“Our Anti-Poverty Strategy aims to help and support people who are experiencing hardship and it is clear that our work, ranging from increasing incomes by promoting the Real Living Wage to employers, to helping reduce utility costs for low income families, is making a difference.

“We know that while the Cambridge economy continues to be successful, some residents continue to face poverty and inequality. That is why we remain committed to working with others to support those who need our help most.”

Councillors approved the recommendations in a report, Allocation of Sharing Prosperity Fund at Community Services Scrutiny Committee on 15 March.

 

Cambridge Labour is tackling poverty

16 March, 2018. NEW MONEY FOR INITIATIVES TO TACKLE POVERTY   CAMBRIDGE city councillors have given the green light to £305,000 funding for eight projects aimed at improving the lives of...

March 2017

I am saddened and somewhat ashamed when residents point out the trip hazards on pavements and potholes in the roads because there is very little that I can do about it.  I am a city councillor, and roads and pavements are a County Council responsibility. 

One thing that can be done is that you can report this sort of problem at https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/travel-roads-and-parking/roads-and-pathways/roadworks-and-faults/

If you do this you can make sure that County know about the problem

November 2017

I just had to let another Romsey resident know that their pavements will not be repaired.  This time it was Catharine St that had captured my attention after a resident had drawn my attention to the state of their pavement.

I contacted the County Council as they are responsible for pavements (and roads).  I was told the pavement budget had been spent up until 2021 and that even then it was unlikely that there would be money to spare except in the most extreme cases.

 

Given that Shire Hall takes takes £1190 from me as their share of my council tax, perhaps someone will tell me how much of it they spend in Cambridge?

 

COUNCIL_TAX.jpeg 

https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/travel-roads-and-parking/roads-and-pathways/roadworks-and-faults/

 

 

Romsey pavements

March 2017 I am saddened and somewhat ashamed when residents point out the trip hazards on pavements and potholes in the roads because there is very little that I can...

11-3-18 .  Well it finally happened.

Well done to all those people who made it to Romsey Lakes today.  And by the response from the 1,000 or so people who came, all the effort was worthwhile.
Thanks to Guy and the volunteers who made it possible.
Thanks to everyone for leaving your cars at home. 

I anticipate another opening in April - watch this space.

 

 

From Capturing Cambridge website. 

http://www.capturingcambridge.org/mill-road-area/coldhams-lane/norman-cement-works/

http://www.capturingcambridge.org/mill-road-area/coldhams-lane/saxon-cement-works/

Saxon & Norman Works:

http://www.capturingcambridge.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/East_Romsey_Cement_Works_2nd_edn.pdf

 

 

February 2018

Trial opening of the lakes on 11th March between 1000 and 1500.

At long last a trial opening of the lakes will take place on 11th March.

if you decide to visit, please don't bring your car - there is nowhere to park.

Children must be escorted and no dogs.

I am not the first person to try to achieve this opening.  I have stood on the shoulders of others who went before me and prepared the way for me to succeed.

The following from the local plan may be of interest to people viewing this page.

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I went down to the lakes on Thursday to check everything was OK for the open day on Sunday. In the background are 'Romsey Cliffs'.

 

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January 2018

On the 16th January I chaired a meeting of the wider committee that has helped to organise the opening the lakes.  At that meeting I was able to announce that we are almost ready to open the lakes on a trial basis.

Volunteers have been working at the lakes to prepare for the opening

There have been a number of setbacks which have stopped the opening in the past, but watch this space for a date to be announced in March 2018.

Thank you to the volunteers who have helped to make this possible

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February 2017

For three years now Romsey Labour Councillors have been working to get the Romsey Lakes open to the public.  We have held a number of public meetings and worked closely with council officers and Anderson to recognise what the public want and achieve this in a safe and efficient way.

The planning application which recognises our wishes will soon be in the public domain and this includes an application to provide 450 homes 40% of which will be affordable.  

The next phase of the public consultation is happening at the Holiday Inn, Coldhams Business Park , CB1 3LH between 1600 to 2000 on Thursday 24th February and 1000 to 1600 on Saturday 25th February 

http://www.coldhamslane.co.uk/

http://www.andersongroup.co.uk/case-studies/underwater-and-overlooked/

 

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December 2016

There has been a great deal happening with Labour's plans for the lakes.  A series of meetings with Andersons have been taking place over the past three months and we hope to announce something extremely positive in late January early February.

Unfortunately the content of the meetings is confidential and we are at a delicate stage, but I am very confident that people will be extremely positive about the announcement when it comes.

What I can say is that we have followed the steer given by the public meetings that have taken place.

 

30-6-16


A meeting is arranged with Anderson for the 11th July
Watch this space

 

18-6-16

The local and PCC elections and now the European Referendum have meant that I have had to focus elsewhere but this does not mean I have let this matter drop.  I am in regular touch with officers to try to get communications working properly with Anderson but they do not seem to be responding effectively.  The ball is very much in Anderson's court as we are ready to proceed to a plan to open the Lakes for visitors.

2-3-16

Met again with officers and we are still having difficulty obtaining the ecology report from Anderson.  I have reached out to the owner and communications have been re-established.

Plans are still moving forward from our perspective.

Our Health and Safety report has raised some issues that are not significant but will need to be addressed.


Officers are working hard and we have a plan, but first we need the ecology report from Anderson.

We have a meeting scheduled for next month.

 

2-2-16

I had a meeting today with council officers.  

  • Anderson appear to have stalled on their promise to release the ecology report
  • Meeting with Peterhouse is arranged for later in the month
  • A full Health and Safety inspection is now under way to build on the preliminary all clear that we received from the insurance company
  • Conversations are taking place about controlling anti-social behaviour
  • Communications plan will be in place by the end of the month

I have asked for a further meeting with officers before the end of the month to update me

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Follow this link to read about the history of the cement works whose workers dug the hole that is now full of water and which we call The Lakes 

UPDATE 19-11-15  Next Steps Committee

A successful and well attended meeting last evening at Mill Road Depot.

There were updates from

  • City Council
  • Andersons

There was also wide ranging discussions on a number of topics. In particular there was a concern over rumours that were being circulated about further uses for the lakes.  It was agreed that all members of the committee would provide the same message.

The lakes will be opened for walking only - there is no other agenda

 

The actions that are required as a consequence on the discussions from last night’s meeting.

  • The City Council, Anderson and Peterhouse are to meet  and encourage Peterhouse to support the aspirations to open the lakes for walking in the short term and for the longer term entering into an agreement on how the collective ownership manage the site to the approved Masterplan.  Alistair Wilson/ Craig Rought and Rob Linney
  • The Risk Assessments completed by City Council Officers and Zurich Municipal will be shared with Anderson.  
  • A long term and a short term plan may be needed and supported by a Communication Plan, to manage local expectations.  
  • The City Council will discuss and agree a policy on dogs using the site, and with the help of the Enforcement Team consider the use of Dog Control Orders. 
  • There will a follow up meeting with the East Cambridge Urban Park group when the ecological reports are available.
  • Meet with the Angling Club to discuss ecological improvements they wish to make.  
  • The City Council will make arrangements for a further series of Open Days for Spring 2016. 

 

 

 

UPDATE 4-11-15

NEXT STEPS MEETING

I held a successful meeting with Carina O'Reilly and council officers yesterday to report on the displays and consultations that have taken place at East and South Area Committees and the 4 tours public tours.

It has been agreed that the time is approaching for council officers to start negotiations with Anderson's and to this end the forecast 'Next Steps' committee on the 18-11-15 will now take place.

This is how I see the future

  • Next Steps meeting 18-11-15 will bring people up-to-date
  • Anderson and the City Council will discuss terms and the Master Plan
  • Anderson will apply for planning permission
  • City Council will consider the planning application

 

 

3-10-15 Two more visits to the lakes - this time in the sun

 

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24-9-15  Residents viewed the lakes today - more trips next week

:) 

There were questions about current ownership and these are answered below

 

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AN INVITE TO SEE THE LAKES - LIMITED OFFER

 

 

 

 

Proposed East Cambridge Country Park

Public guided tour

 

The City Council would like to invite interested members of the public to attend a guided walk around the former Cement Pits at Coldham’s Lane, to hear about proposals to allow public access for quiet recreation around this attractive and wildlife rich site.

 

Thursday 24th September      14.30—16.00

Tuesday 29th September       12.30—14.00

Saturday 3rd October            10.30—12.00

 

Please register your interest to attend one of the above tours at: parks@cambridge.gov.uk or call

01223 458520 during office hours

 

 

 A year ago to have thought we would be this far down the line was difficult.

But the potential opening of the lakes is now becoming a reality 

 

 

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(25-7-15)

We are mindful of the potential difficulties in just opening the lakes so we are going to open them for one or two days as a trial for people to see the potential.  

When the dates are agreed people will be asked to apply on a first come first served basis and visitors will be organised in groups to be taken around the lakes

 

(8-7-15)

This afternoon the 'Next Steps' group met at Mill Rd Depot to consider an open day date for the lakes.

We also considered an agenda for getting the lakes open to the public for walking.

Although progress seems slow be assured we are moving forward.

:)

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(23-6-15)

We took the Lake's Committee around the lakes last night.

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Zoe Moghadas, Colin Wiles and Baroness Worthington visiting the lakes

below

Sue Wells (Chair of Friends of Cherry Hinton Brook) and Dave Baigent (Chair of the Labour led council group working to open the lakes to the public)

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In two weeks time the 'next steps' group will be meeting to consider how to open the lakes.

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(8-6-15)

Met with officers today as Chair of the East Area Urban Park Committee and suggested:

  • We immediately carry out a health and safety inspection
  • We offer an opportunity for those who attended the public meetings to walk around the lakes
  • We ask Anderson's for an interim ecological report
  • We set a date for a meeting of the 'next steps' group 

(7-6-15)

Now that the General Election is out of the way I am meeting with officers tomorrow to discuss the next steps we shall be taking, and to find out how much the delay in the City Plan will influence the opening.

Wait for the update.

 

(21-5-1)

 

I have to say that nothing would have happened if it hadn't been for the local campaign group led by Steve Turval and his colleagues.  They campaigned locally for over three years and it was one of their group who persuaded me to take up the campaign if I got elected as City Councillor.

I pledged to help, and during my first year on the council I have established a public committee to bring people together.  This committee has council support and now it only a matter of waiting for the result of the local plan before we can put proposals out for a proper public debate. Then it is a matter for Cambridge City Council to make the final decision and hopefully we shall open the lakes for walking.

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Anderson's invite to public consultation 27-2-15 

Dave Baigent attended the consultation meeting at the David Lloyd Centre and spent over two hours having lively debates with some of the 350 people who attended.
It is important to note that nothing is set in stone but that following Dave getting the interested parties together at two meetings at the Guildhall there has been a considerable activity.
This consultation is the next step towards a potential opening of one lake for walkers.  There are a lot of hurdles to cross, including keeping safety at the top of the agenda. People are invited to respond to Anderson's Questionnaire as part of this next phase of consultation.  

The website is available at www.lakesrecreation.co.uk and comments can be made here or to enquiries@lakesrecreation.co.uk

 

 

cambridge_lakes_Masterplan_board_(1).jpg

17-2-15

People will have been monitoring the meetings Chaired by Dave Baigent at the Guildhall on the lakes.  It now seems likely that walking access will become available this year subject to health and safety approval and agreement about how to protect the ecology of the site.

This of course is part of a wider scheme to develop the land at the back of the lakes adjacent to Coldhams Lane.  To ensure people are up to date the Anderson Group will be providing a public consultation event for their draft plans for the whole site as follows

-       Saturday 28th Feb @ David Lloyd, 11am to 4pm.

-       Monday 2nd March @ Queen Emma Primary School, 5.30pm to 8.30pm.

 

for further details go to http://romsey.cambridgelabour.org.uk/l

 

Dave Baigent City Councillor for Romsey

29th January at the Guildhall.

Cllr Dave Baigent chaired a second public meeting to discuss the future of the lakes. Committee room one was filled to capacity by representatives of over 30 groups and individuals.

Dave was able to inform the meeting that there had been a considerable progress since the first meeting and that it was now possible to see a light on the horizon in the move to get the lakes open to 'walkers'.  

Patsy Dell head of planning at Cambridge City Council advised the meeting that the draft city plan laid out a vision for the future, and that her and Dave were meeting regularly with interested groups on the council and outside to make this proposal a reality.

Cam Lakes reported on how their survey had almost 1000 responses and that the vast majority of these were positive.  Fiona gave a detailed explanation of some of the trends shown in the survey and Dave thanked her and the rest of her team for carrying out this important work.

The Managing Director of the Anderson Group Andrew Jay explained that he was in favour of opening the first lake.  Discussions were already in hand with insurers and Andrew also spoke about how advice was being sought on what a management group would look like.  Anderson's will be holding a public consultation late in February at which they will be providing their initial thoughts for the whole site.

Patsy, Andrew, Fiona and Dave responded to a wide range of questions in what proved to be an friendly, informed and lively debate.

Towards the end of the meeting Dave asked for volunteers for a smaller project group to look in more detail at the proposal.  

In summing up the meeting Dave said "The prize is clear: the opening of the first lake to walkers, early consideration to disabled access, the protection of the ecology and foremost in the minds of all would be the safety of those using the site."

Before closing the meeting Dave thanked Patsy, Andrew Fiona and the wider meeting for their support.

Addendum  CEN are running a story about Romsey Beach, this is not on the agenda.  Current thinking is to get a lake open for walking in the first instance.  Talk of beaches, donkey rides and public water access are misplaced at this time.

 

 

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Cllr. Dave Baigent in the chair, with Patsy Dell

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Cambridge Lakes were open today

11-3-18 .  Well it finally happened.Well done to all those people who made it to Romsey Lakes today.  And by the response from the 1,000 or so people who came,...

21-2-18

Plans are now being drawn up for submission to the planning committee.

 

12-11-17

There are currently 2500 applicants on the housing register and the council are going to develop the Mill Road Depot to deliver 187 new homes.  94 of these will be Council Homes, open space will comprise 28% of the site area.  AND the YMCA are going to build accommodation for 140-150 people on the site.  

In return the council will take over their existing building on Gonville Place and that will provide an opportunity to level the YMCA building and the current Council Car Park to provide a large site for an underground car park and homes above; other options may be considered but we are set to deliver more council homes on this site.

 

3-11-17

Exhibition at Mill Road Depot was well received yesterday.  We will of course analyse and consider the public comments.  It is expected a planning application will be submitted on the 19th of November and that the planning committee will consider this in March 2018 

 ozzie_and_kevin.jpg Cllr Kevin Price and Ozzie

 

 

rosie_and_cyclist.jpgCllr Rosie Moore and Martin Lucas-Smith from the cycling campaign 

 

plan.jpg A plan view

range_of_homes.jpg The final tally of homes to be built

 

16-10-17

FOLLOWING EARLIER DISCUSSIONS WITH RESIDENTS

The City Council and their joint venture partners, Hill Investment Partnership, now want to consult people about detailed options for the site includ-ing the proportion of affordable homes which can be built. 

A new exhibition will, be held from 

3pm to 8pm on Thursday 2nd NOVEMBER 

November in the Bharat Bhavan (former Library) at the entrance to the depot on Mill Rd. 

 

9-10-17

This evening Strategy and Resources Committee agreed the arrangements for the Cambridge Investment Partnership.  This is potentially going to be the vehicle for delivery of the homes on Mill Road Depot.  No decisions have yet been made as to how this site will be developed but we have an assurance that at least 50% of the homes will be council houses.

 

There will be a further public consultation on the 2nd November.  Watch this space for time and venue 

  

To be able to view the current draft proposals which provide an outline of how the scheme may look go to  https://www.millroad-development.co.uk

cambridge.gov.uk/sites/default/files/mill_road_depot_planning_and_development_brief_-_low_res_version.pdf

To be able to comment on the current proposals go to millroad-development https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CIPMRD  

To view the current SPD for this site go to https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/sites/default/files/mill_road_depot_planning_and_development_brief_-_low_res_version.pdf

Cambridge Cycle Campaign have produced a very clear piece on the depot summarised on their website

 

Mill Road Depot Consultation

21-2-18 Plans are now being drawn up for submission to the planning committee.   12-11-17 There are currently 2500 applicants on the housing register and the council are going to develop...

UPDATE 11-1-18 

There are a new set of plans on the Council website https://t.co/t7uAPkCRGo

Please look at them and make a comment

The developer's design and access statement is here 

 

 

 

 

5-7-17 Romsey Labour put forward a range of objections to the development of this site as student housing and at the recent planning committee the application was rejected.

We have contacted the developer to ask for a further meeting

 

The plans to build more student accommodation in Romsey means no affordable housing.

To see and comment on the plans for this development go to this link

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Previously we had said:

In another good example of how we can all gain from consultations, the team planning the development of the Labour Club site met with Romsey councillors and EMRAG yesterday (2-2-15).  

The nursery, which labour had called for, remains in the current draft plan, but the majority of the accommodation in the draft plan presented for discussion was for student flats.  

For my part I argued that "what is wanted is homes for workers."  I called for at least 40% to be social housing and for the remainder to be homes aimed at Cambridge residents.   

The meeting was cordial and both groups have adjourned to review the situation.

For my part I remain clear - Romsey needs homes for local workers and that this should be reflected in this important local site. 

  

 

 11th July 2014

There was a meeting with the owner to discuss his plans for the Labour Club Building on the 11th July 2014 and he explained how his preliminary thoughts were to provide a space for a nursery (this was a labour suggestion), a retail unit, some community space and accommodation (potentially for students or professionals).  
The front face and side elevation will be retained.
Following the discussions we now await more concrete plans.

Many local people will have connections to this club. For some it will have been a regular or occasional watering hole. For others it will be the place where they arranged gigs and meetings. There will be many who held receptions, parties and events and for all these people this announcement will come both as a surprise and a regret.
Are we going to see developers try to knock it down and build yet more flats or will they try to work within the existing building? No one knows and this lack of knowledge will be a difficulty for anyone trying to challenge or even understand this change. People in Romsey that I talk to are getting very tired of the constant development and re-development and the lack of concern by developers for the wishes of the people.
Time will tell, and I suppose it is wrong to speculate too much but we are entitled to a say in any change of use or worse and I for one will be trying to organise support to ensure that democracy and localism can work.

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If we are going to save this historic building then we need to act fast, the club is now closed and we wait to see what the developers plan.
See what the Cambridge Evening News has to say

We need as much information as possible - let us know what you know?
Let us know what you want to do?

LEAVE YOU COMMENTS BELOW 

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LEAVE YOU COMMENTS BELOW 

Romsey Labour Club: go online and reject the plans for more student accommodation

UPDATE 11-1-18  There are a new set of plans on the Council website https://t.co/t7uAPkCRGo Please look at them and make a comment The developer's design and access statement is here   ...

When parents were told that St Philips was to be made an academy and that there was nothing that could be done to stop this, local parents held a meeting to challenge that outcome.  The meeting was well attended and parents were joined by local councillor Dave Baigent and a representative from Daniel Zeichner's office, members of the IEB and some members from the Ely diocese academy trust.  As an outcome the consultation was extended so that all the parents and interested parties could have an opportunity to make comments. 

A number of meetings were then held, parents were asked to sign a petition at the school gates, and County Councillors Whitehead and Kavanagh and the representative for Daniel Zeichner were allowed to speak at the decision making meeting. 

We have just heard that the decision was to leave St Philips as a LOCAL AUTHORITY SCHOOL. 

This is victory for democracy in that people stood up to be counted and made their arguments, and the IEB have recommended that the school should remain with the Local Authority as a maintained school at this time.

 

Letter received about St Philips

Dear Parents, Carers, Staff and Friends of St Philip’s,

I am writing to inform you of the decision taken by the IEB at a meeting yesterday about whether St Philip’s CofE VA School should become an academy. The decision was that the IEB recommend that the school should remain with the Local Authority as a maintained school at this time.

In coming to this decision the IEB considered all the information and contributions we have received and was based on what, in our judgement, would be in the best interests of the school in order to ensure continued school improvement at this time.

The IEB wish to make it clear that this decision is as much about timing as anything else and is not intended as a reflection on DEMAT who, all agreed, have shown themselves to be a supportive MAT with genuine care for their schools and communities.

The main reasons that the IEB has come to the decision it has are listed below.

The school has had a two year period of instability and the first priority of the IEB is to give the school a period of stability in order to support continuous school improvement.

The Headteacher is newly in post and needs time to continue apace the school improvement work already being undertaken to good effect. The IEB noted that in the consultation all comments on improvement currently being driven by the Headteacher were positive. The IEB feels the process of converting to an academy could potentially deflect the Headteacher’s attention from this task and so slow the school’s improvement journey.

The IEB was very mindful of the strongly held opinions of different complexions of the parents and local community who are very satisfied with how the school is progressing under the Headteacher and Local Authority.

The IEB recognises that there is high quality support in place by the Local Authority and future plans show this will remain in place for at least the short to medium term future.

The IEB heard compelling evidence of effective current partnerships between CSoC (Church Schools of Cambridge), the Local Authority, DEMAT/Diocese and the school, to support the school.      Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together     Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together     Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together     Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together     Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together     Headteacher: Sally Allan MEd (Cantab) St Philip’s C.E. (A) Community Primary School, 2 Vinery Way, Cambridge CB1 3DR Tel: 01223 508707 Email: office@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk www.stphilips.cambs.sch.uk Achieving Together

At the current time, the IEB could not find any compelling evidence that converting to an academy would bring any additional benefits to the school or outweigh the benefits of staying with the Local Authority.

The IEB has no reservations about DEMAT as a MAT (Multi Academy Trust) and recommend that if the school returns to maintained governance arrangements that the future governing body reconsiders this decision as the position may change when the school has had a period of stability and consolidated the improvements that have just begun.

The IEB would like to make it clear that they, and others, think highly of DEMAT and a large part of the decision made was due to the timing in relation to the school’s improvement journey.

In conclusion, the IEB made this decision for these reasons as they believe it is in the best interests of the children and their education at the current time.

We thank you all for continued interest in and support for the school.

Yours sincerely,

Penny Conway

Chair of the IEB

 

 

 

 

If you want to object email consultation@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk 

Daniel Zeichner MP slams forced academisation of Cambridge Primary School during Westminster debate

 
Daniel Zeichner, MP for Cambridge has challenged the Secretary of State for Education in the House of Commons over her lack of regard for parental choice after making reference to the academisation of Cambridge primary school St Philip's.
 
Mr Zeichner said:Extraordinarily, although a consultation is going on, the parents already have been told that the outcome is a forgone conclusion.“ And then posed the question: “Why is the Secretary of State so opposed to parental choice?“
 
Parents of St Philip's have been asked to provide feedback on proposals that would see the Church of England school become an academy and join the Diocese of Ely Multi Academy Trust (DEMAT). The schools Interim Executive Board (IEB) has stated that they believe academisation will best serve the long term interests of the school after it received a warning notice from the Local Educational Authority last Autumn.  
 
 
There have been a number of questions raised over the transparency of the process after it was confirmed by the IEB that they incorrectly informed parents that academisation could not be stopped. Since the consultation process started a number of parents have voiced opposition to academisation with a group even coordinating a petition that Mr Zeichner understands has already received 70 signatures.
 
Daniel Zeichner said: “My primary concern is that the parents and the local community are involved in the future of St Philip's.“
 
“It is not proven that academisation is always in the best interest of schools and improvements at St Philip's over the last year show that this school was capable of making the necessary improvements and returning to the high standards previously recognised by OFSTED. Forced academisation is the ideological fixation of a Government that is failing to resource schools properly - I hope the Regional Schools Commissioner will take note of the views of parents and staff and show that this is a genuine consultation, not a done deal."

 

 

 

2-11-17

At the meeting on the 1st of November there was a considerable discussion about the academisation of St Phillips.  The NUT provided a spokesperson who gave their view on what was happening.  A number of other parties related to this declined to attend.  People who wish to submit a response to the consultation should email direct to consultation@stphilips.cambs.sch.uk 

 

1st November - there will be a meeting to discuss the potential academisation of St Phillips at Notts Own Scout Centre, Cyprus Road, Cambridge at 1930

The question i want to ask is, "if the Ely Diocese is proposing to bring St Phillips into its academy then why cant they help St Phillips as it currently stands?".

Try to keep some time free to attend the evening of the 1st as no final decision has been made about if St Phillips should become an academy.

 

11th October 2017 update

At a meeting held last night at St Phillips School it became clear that the letter sent to parents that the acadamisation of St Phillips was a done deal was incorrect.  There is still time to argue for St Phillips to remain within Local Government control. 

We also managed to obtain an agreement that the consultation will be extended by at least 28 days.  As a consequence there is still time to join in the consultation.  

We are also attempting to get the education authority to hold a public meeting - watch this space. 

 

Is St Philips sleepwalking towards being taken over by an Academy Chain?

Is it in the best interests of the school and our children?

 

Dear residents/parents,

As parents of children at St Philip’s, we are worried that our school is about to be turned into an Academy and that this is being done with no genuine consultation.  There was a brief meeting just before the summer for parents to discuss this with the IEB (Interim Executive Board) and representatives of DEMAT (the proposed Academy Trust).  At that meeting some parents asked if there was anything we could do to halt this process.  We were told clearly, “No”.  We also asked if there had ever been a point in the past at which we could have halted this process.  Again, we were told, “No”.  Parents apparently had no choice in the matter at all.

We’re no experts, but the research we have done since that meeting suggests that there certainly was a time when we could have had a meaningful say in this, and that in fact we can still do so now.

Both staff and parents have been led to believe that the issuing of a “Warning Notice” to the school, followed by the appointment of an IEB, meant that Academisation was inevitable and unavoidable. It is for this reason that the IEB (which does not include any representatives from the parent community) made an application for this to happen. 

However, the guidance from the Department of Education is clear that while the Regional Schools Commissioner (RSC) may make an academy order (i.e. force a school to become an academy) when a school has been issued with a warning notice, it does not have to do so, and different methods of intervention can be chosen. The same is also true if an IEB has been put in place – this does not give the RSC the power to make an academy order.  If a school fails to comply with a warning notice, the RSC does then have the power to make an academy order but even then they can still opt for a different method of intervention if they wish.  While we know a warning notice was served, it is not clear St Philips failed to comply with it.  We would hope that parents would have been informed if that was the case.  Either way, it seems that the IEB was not compelled to take us down the academisation route and parents should be given an opportunity to have a genuine discussion about whether or not academisation is the road we wish to go down.

If you share our concerns, or just want to hear more about what is going on, please come along to the meeting at the school next Tuesday (10th October) and make sure parent’s voices are heard.

Please see over for some reasons that academisation is not always the best choice for a school in our position to make.

Richard Rippin – richard.rippin@gmail.com – 07886 757987

Alison Hoare

SOME FACTS ABOUT ACADEMIES

 

Academies bring risk with no evidence of benefits

  • Academisation does not improve schools: Local Authorities have a better record in school improvement. 
  • Academisation is politically risky: a new government could change the system.
  • MATs (multi academy trusts) are vulnerable to take overs by other academy chains. They can be gifted to other MATs with no consultation. Academy schools can also become ‘orphan schools’ with no sponsor/MAT willing to support it. There are over 60 schools already in this predicament.
  • Many MATs have a board of trustees that is not connected to its member schools and have no elected staff or parent representatives.
  • Academisation is forever: there is no way back to local democratic control.

 

Conditions for our teachers

  • Academies are free to set the pay and conditions of staff.
  • Academisation has seen the emergence of greater inequality in education. For example, there is a growing disparity between the salaries of headteachers and the CEOs of some MATS; there are over 100 CEOs earning more than £175,000, while the average headteacher pay in secondary school is £80,000 to £120,000, and less for primary schools.
  • Academisation is opposed by all the teacher trade unions.

 

Competition between schools

  • Academisation is based on a belief that creating a ‘free market of competing schools’ is a better way to provide education. All the evidence from education systems around the world suggests collaboration is more effective. 
  • Academies are businesses: education is not a business.

 

What is needed for an excellent education?

The best way to create a good school, and an inspiring environment for children, is to have excellent teachers, who are secure in their jobs and have a supportive leadership. We now have all of these elements at St Philip’s!

The school does not need to become an Academy!

 

 

St Philips to remain under local authority control

When parents were told that St Philips was to be made an academy and that there was nothing that could be done to stop this, local parents held a meeting...

Big Data released from Cambridge vehicle survey 

Preliminary ‘big data’ from an eight-day study of millions of vehicle movements traveling in Cambridge has been published by the Greater Cambridge Partnership today <21 November 2017>. 

The anonymised data, capturing information on vehicle movements in, out and through the city, has been made available as ‘open data’ - allowing public access and the chance to suggest innovative transport solutions.

It follows some initial findings published earlier this month, which showed that over five million vehicle journeys were captured in a single week and over half of the cars recorded (56%) were diesel and contributing to the city’s pollution levels. 

This initial data, published on Cambridgeshire Insight, provides origin and destination and trip chain reports derived from the traffic survey using Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) cameras undertaken across the Cambridge area from 10 - 17 June 2017. 

The remainder of the vast dataset is currently being reviewed to ensure that no vehicle is identifiable and the data remains fully anonymous. It is envisaged that the full dataset from the traffic survey will be published in early 2018. 

The ANPR survey was undertaken to provide additional and up-to-date information on the city’s road network to help inform the development of transport schemes.

Chair of the Greater Cambridge Partnership, said: “We are pleased that we can release some initial data into the public domain, so residents and other interested parties are able to undertake their own analysis and participate in the ongoing development of the city’s future transport provision.

“A traffic survey of this scale has never been done before in Cambridge so we’re proud to be achieving another first for our great city. The sheer volume of data means it’s taking some time to review and we need to ensure its anonymity and accuracy.”

The origin and destination reports published provide information on the first and last cameras triggered on vehicle journeys across the city. The trip chain reports provide additional detail, giving the camera survey sites triggered along vehicle routes across the network. 

The Greater Cambridge Partnership has a number of upcoming events on tackling some of the city’s transport issues, including a Wayfinding Hackathon on 25 November, workshop for staff and visitors to Addenbrooke’s Hospital on 28 November, followed by a Cambridge Network Future Transport Event on 30 November.

For further information about upcoming events and any queries on the dataset, please visit the Greater Cambridge Partnership website:www.greatercambridge.org.uk

 

Notes to Editors

 

For further information, please contact: Livia Oldland, Communications Manager, on 01223 714699/07468 766360 or livia.oldland@cambridgeshire.gov.uk.

 

The data from the vehicle survey are available to download on the Cambridgeshire Insight website:

Please note that the maximum trip chain duration within the reports is two hours, and that vehicles travelling ‘outbound’ past an external camera site will end that particular trip chain. The ‘Taxi’ classification includes only Hackney Carriages.

 

Please also note that these reports are preliminary and are undergoing review; revisions may be published later. Any comments or feedback to: contactus@greatercambridge.org.uk

Traffic Survey

Big Data released from Cambridge vehicle survey  Preliminary ‘big data’ from an eight-day study of millions of vehicle movements traveling in Cambridge has been published by the Greater Cambridge Partnership...

WHAT A WONDERFUL RESULT FOR LABOUR and DANIEL

IN Romsey we did particularly well for Labour.  We achieved a record 82% turnout and the following results
Greens 110
Tories 578
Libs 1289
Labour a stonking 2989 which gave Daniel a 60% vote

 

Election Candidate Party Votes %  
 Daniel Zeichner Labour 29032 52% Elected
 Julian Leon Huppert Liberal Democrat 16371 29% Not elected
 John Hayward Conservative 9133 16% Not elected
 Stuart James Tuckwood Green Party 1265 2% Not elected
 Keith Alexander Garrett Rebooting Democracy 133 0% Not elected

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-6-17 Jeremy's Latest speech in Gateshead

Jeremy Corbyn song

 

26-5-17 After the very sad events in Manchester Labour's campaign resumes watch Jeremy's speech Here Read it Here

A whole host of videos by Jeremy

Read what Labour are actually offering in their Manifesto  

See the videos

1 millionhomes https://t.co/oixB4Scb0U

Protecting the weak https://t.co/3O5zJuTAXu

Saving the nhs https://t.co/SSu37de6ym

Standing up for the many not the few https://t.co/G7ecSbBbIh

Keir Starmer on European workers https://t.co/dk6bPbYETN

Read this from Jeremy 26-5-17

Today, as Labour resumes campaigning in the General Election, I wanted to reach out to you, as a member of our party — and of our Labour family.

Our nation has been united in shock and grief. But as I watched thousands of people coming together in Albert Square in Manchester, I saw unwavering defiance too.

This attack sought to divide us, and instead we sent a powerful message of solidarity and of love. We saw so much evidence of our humanity: from the people we ask to protect us in the emergency services; from those who rushed towards the carnage to comfort the dying or offered lifts home and places to stay; from those gathered the following day in Albert Square.

So for the rest of this election campaign all of us need to stand together and we need to stand up for democracy.

Because when we talk about British values, including tolerance and mutual support, democracy is at the very heart of them.

And our General Election campaigns are the centrepieces of our democracy — rallies, debates, campaigning in marketplaces, knocking on doors, listening to people on their streets, at their workplaces and in their homes.

So many of you are already a part of this incredible campaign. If you'd like to join us this weekend you can sign up here.

Together, we will be stronger. Together we can build a Britain worthy of those who died and those who have inspired us all in Manchester this week.

Thank you.

Jeremy Corbyn
Leader of the Labour Party

  

 

JEREMY SAID 29TH APRIL 2017

As leader he said he had forced the government into U-turns on tax credits, disability payments and attempts to increase national insurance for the self-employed. 

On his leadership philosophy, he said his critics had a right to make a reasoned case and challenge leadership. If leaders go unchallenged, they can make some of the most damaging mistakes, he said. ”And if party leaders put themselves ahead of serving the people, they stop listening and even put our country at risk.”

He warned there are signs of the prime minister and her closest advisers are slipping into a presidential bunker mentality. “Whereas it is the job of leadership to hold open the space for dissent, new thinking and fit-for-purpose policy,” he said.

He added: “Whereas insecure leaders want to feel stronger by asking you to give them more power. I recognise strong leadership as equipping you with more power.”

He said he would not allow free thinking to be “shut down by a hostile media or an elite that scoffs at anyone who dares to step out of line”.

He used the speech to make a plea for 2.4 million young people missing from the UK’s electoral register to sign up. He said barely 40% of 18- to 24-year olds turn out to vote.

“The Conservatives are more than happy with this state of affairs. Apathy and resignation will secure them seats on election day,” he said.

 

 

A message from our MP Daniel Zeichner

Your chance to say “No More” to the most right-wing Conservative government in modern history

   Daniel_Zeichner_at_pmqs.png

Two days ago, shortly after Theresa May’s announcement, our MP Daniel Zeichner sent this email to Labour members in Cambridge.  For those readers who will not have received it, here it is in full:

As you will be aware, today Prime Minster Theresa May has announced her intention, less than two years after the last election, to hold another General Election on Thursday 8 June.

This is an election like no other.  We are faced with the most right-wing Conservative Government in modern history – a ruling party taken over by Euro-sceptics, and one that has shown an exceptionally cruel streak towards the young, the old, the poor and those with a disability.  This election is your chance to say: no more!

I have been your MP for nearly two years.  In that time, I have run countless surgeries and campaigns, attended hundreds of community events, worked with local councillors, trade unions and campaign groups and met thousands of residents.  I have shown that a Labour MP can and does make a positive difference to people’s lives. In the same way, a Labour Government will give all of us in Britain a far better future.

During my time as your MP, I have always put the interests of the people of our diverse and beautiful city first, ahead of the games in Westminster:  I stood in 2015 because of the contempt shown by the Coalition to ordinary working people; and I voted and argued consistently against leaving the EU.

In this election, the candidate for the Liberal Democrats in Cambridge will be the politician who lost the seat in 2015.  The choice is clear: do people want a representative who backed a Tory Government, or do they want an MP who will never side with the heartless Tories who, since 2010, have damaged our country so much?

Daniel Zeichner

Jeremy Says (Edited from the Guardian Article) 

Jeremy Corbyn 

Is pledging to bust the “cosy cartel” of British politics as he insists Labour is poised to form the next government.

“Much of the media and establishment are saying this election is a foregone conclusion,” he will say.“They think there are rules in politics, which if you don’t follow by doffing your cap to powerful people, accepting that things can’t really change, then you can’t win.

“They say I don’t play by the rules – their rules. We can’t win, they say, because we don’t play their game. They’re quite right I don’t. And a Labour government elected on 8 June won’t play by their rules.

He will say that fatcat bosses and corporations should be afraid of a Labour victory. 

“If I were Southern Rail or Philip Green [chairman of Arcadia Group], I’d be worried about a Labour government.”

“If I were Mike Ashley [chairman of Sports Direct] or the CEO of a tax-avoiding multinational corporation, I’d want to see a Tory victory. Labour is the party that will put the interests of the majority first.”

 “When we win, it’s the people – not the powerful – who win. The nurse, the teacher, the small trader, the carer, the builder, the office worker win. We all win.”

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 Jeremy Corbyn: general election is about ‘future of all of us’

The Labour leader made a symbolic visit to Croydon Central, the seat of housing minister Gavin Barwell, on Wednesday, to underline his ambition to “prove the establishment experts wrong,” and snatch seats from the Conservatives.

Labour hopes to steer the debate to the state of the economy, living standards, schools and the NHS – while prime minister Theresa May has repeatedly presented it as a test of her leadership against Corbyn’s.

May flew to Bolton North East on Wednesday night by helicopter, to speak to an audience of activists. 

Downing Street said she plans to meet as many voters as she can once the campaign kicks off, rather than sticking to the carefully stage-managed events that characterised the failed remain campaign in last year’s EU referendum. 

“It’s going to be all about meeting people, knocking on doors, having those personal conversations,” said a No 10 source, adding that the campaign would have “its own unique feel”.

Labour categorically ruled out entering a coalition with the Scottish National party on Wednesday, after SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said she was willing to consider a “progressive alliance” to take on the Tories.

Former Labour leader Ed Miliband was relentlessly pilloried by the Conservatives as the puppet of the SNP during the 2015 election campaign, and Corbyn is keen to avoid constant speculation about the makeup of potential coalitions.

Speaking on Wednesday afternoon, Corbyn said, “There will be no coalition deal with the SNP and a Labour government.” 

He added that he did not consider Nicola Sturgeon’s party to be progressive, because it had passed on Tory spending cuts in Scotland.

“The SNP may talk left at Westminster, but in government in Scotland it acts right,” he said.

 

Jeremy says it as it is - the fatcats are ruggt to be afeaud of Labour
"Much of the media and establishment are saying this election is a foregone conclusion," he will say. "They think there are rules in politics, which if you don't follow by doffing your cap to powerful people, accepting that things can't really change, then you can't win. "They say I don't play by the rules - their rules. We can't win, they say, because we don't play their game. They're quite right I don't. And a Labour government elected on 8 June won't play by their rules." He will say that fatcat bosses and corporations should be afraid of a Labour victory. "If I were Southern Rail or Philip Green [chairman of Arcadia Group], I'd be worried about a Labour government." "If I were Mike Ashley [chairman of Sports Direct] or the CEO of a tax-avoiding multinational corporation, I'd want to...

Free School Meals for all primary children - paid for by introducing VAT on private school fees

Angela Rayner tells us (6-3-17)

I have been up since 5am, we have announced that we would introduce free school meals for all primary school children by introducing VAT on private school fees to pay for it. I have arrived in media city to start a full day talking through our plan starting with Good Morning Britain, then BBC Breakfast Sofa, Today Programme, Five Live and others to be confirmed. Then I will travel to Lancashire to meet up with the leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn MP to formally announce the policy. Here is my statement to the media.

Today at an after school club in Leyland, Lancashire, Jeremy Corbyn and I will announce that the next Labour government will guarantee free school meals for all primary school children. By introducing VAT on private school fees Labour will level the playing field between children. Only 7 per cent of children in England attend private school. VAT on private school fees will raise at least £1.3bn, enabling us to fully fund this policy. Labour’s policy will benefit the education and health of all children by ending a subsidy to the privileged few. I’m a mum and I hate the thought of any child going a whole day at school without a healthy meal.

free_school_meals.jpg

Four million children in Britain are living in poverty – and because of rising in-work poverty, many do not qualify for free school meals under the existing system. Children who eat a healthy lunch do better at school – research has proven that offering universal access to free school meals enables primary school pupils to advance by around two months on average. Give children healthy food and they behave better at school, concentrate more in class and perform better in exams. As a parent I don’t see any downside.

Britain faces a serious health crisis linked to a poor diet – almost 20 per cent of children are obese by the time they leave primary school at 11. There is a real need to address these health problems. We as a nation cannot be satisfied with our children suffering health problems through no fault of their own.

Labour’s policy will help improve the health of our children by making sure every child gets given a nutritious meal at school – over 90 per cent of pupils taking a school lunch eat food or drink containing vegetables or fruit compared with only 58 per cent of pupils bringing in packed lunches. It is right and proper that we aim to ensure every child is receiving a healthy, balanced lunch at school.

Despite these huge benefits, the government is failing to provide children their basic right to a healthy meal. In 2013, the Coalition Government accepted a report that recommended all primary school pupils get free school meals. However, as is usually the case with this government, the plan was quietly dropped. Instead, since 2014, children in reception, year one and year two get free school meals – but funding per child per meal has been frozen, therefore failing to keep up with inflation.

The Conservatives are leading an assault on our country’s schools. The serious funding crisis currently looming over schools has not only left them unable to provide healthy lunches for pupils, but has forced schools like St John’s Primary School in Crowborough to resort to extreme measures such as asking parents to donate essential items – like toilet rolls – that the school can’t afford. It’s simply unacceptable. Our children deserve better and Labour will make sure that’s what they get.

Angela_Rayner.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Shadow Education Secretary, I’ve had enough of seeing schools struggling to provide the support and education children need because of the misplaced priorities of this Conservative government. Free school meals for all children, no matter what their background, will improve the education and health of our children. Labour will deliver it.

The General Election

WHAT A WONDERFUL RESULT FOR LABOUR and DANIEL IN Romsey we did particularly well for Labour.  We achieved a record 82% turnout and the following resultsGreens 110Tories 578Libs 1289Labour a...

This is your opportunity to make June, the end of May.

Only by winning the local elections in May, and the General Election in June, can we achieve the fairer society we want to see in Britain and the world. 

The Labour Party has less than weeks to save Britain. We have 7 weeks to elect a Labour Government that will protect us from an ideologically-driven Tory Hard Brexit, protect the vulnerable and save our public services (such as NHS, Welfare, Education and Emergency Services.  Only Labour will build the much needed homes so that people have a proper roof over their heads.


Join us tomorrow in our canvass sessions by contacting Dave or help out with our leaflet delivery by contacting Liz

Of interest to Romsey

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Our Candidate for the County Council elections in May Noel Kavanagh (currently county councillor for Coleridge) with City Councillors Anna Smith, Dave Baigent

Read Labour's Annual Report to its residents

Labour's Plans for the County Council

  • Reduce congestion and pollution, abolish the park and ride charge

Create a city centre ‘Clean Air Zone’ restore the city centre shuttle bus and deliver the Addenbrookes railway statio

  • Improve roads, pavements and safety
    • Set up a £10m urban repairs fund and reduce Tory dimming of Cambridge’s streetlights 
  • Tackle the housing crisis
    • Deliver 500 council houses and make the County Council a housing developer to build affordable home 
  • Fight poverty and end the social care crisis
    • Create a county-wide Living Wage Campaign, invest nearly £11m in children’s and adult social care to reduce the burden on the NHS 
  • Protect education and libraries
    • Build a brand-new secondary school in Cambridge, keep libraries in public hands, and reverse the £325 cut to library books
  • Reduce congestion and pollution, abolish the park and ride charge
    • Create a city centre ‘Clean Air Zone’ restore the city centre shuttle bus and deliver the Addenbrookes railway station 
  • Improve roads, pavements and safety
    • Set up a £10m urban repairs fund and reduce Tory dimming of Cambridge’s streetlights 
  • Tackle the housing crisis
    • Deliver 500 council houses and make te County Council a housing developer to build affordable homes 
  • Fight poverty and end the social care crisis
    • Create a county-wide Living Wage Campaign, invest nearly £11m in children’s and adult social care to reduce the burden on the NHS
  • Protect education and libraries
  • Build a brand-new secondary school in Cam ridge, keep libraries in public hands, and reverse the £325 cut to library books

 

Romsey Labour are here to represent the people of Romsey and to do this we have to know what they want.  There are a number of ways this is done:

  • we knock on peoples doors and talk to them (canvassing). 
  • we hold meet and great stalls (mainly outside the Coop on Mill Road)
  • we attend local events (we run a stall at The Winter Fair and the proceeds are donated to Romsey Mill).
  • we live in the area
  • we deliver leaflets about our work
  • we answer emails, letters and telephone calls
  • we support local and national causes and demonstrations
  • we hold monthly ward meetings and mid monthly catch ups

In outcome we hope to help people and our community

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Canvassing

We aim to knock on everyone's door at least three times a year and whilst this does not mean we meet everyone it gives us a clear idea of the important issues in Romsey.  For most of the year this is carried out on a Saturday or Sunday when we go out as a group to target specific roads.  As we get closer to elections we increase our door knocking to a point when we are out everyday. Canvassers include our four councillors and members of the Romsey Labour Party and training is given to anyone who wants to join us.  Without this important contact we would not be able to do our job properly and we always need more people to help.

People often think that canvassing is stressful, but its not like that at all.  Almost without exception people in Romsey recognise the need for politicians to talk to the public and are prepared to take part in short debates on their doorstep.  People appreciate rather than resent these interactions and when they are busy they politely say so.  This week we canvassed in Great Eastern Street.

 Canvassing in the spring

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 Canvassing in the winter

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Meet and great stalls

You will probably have seen us outside the Coop on a Saturday morning.  Sometimes we are there with a special message, often about a local issue or the NHS.  We try to do this once a month and it is a very good way of taking the pulse in Romsey.

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Leaflets

Most of you will have seen our leaflets.  In these we try to capture national, citywide and local issues.  As we get closer to the election the amount of leaflets increase and they provide a way for Labour to set out its stall.  We always need help in delivering leaflets so please get in touch if you can spare 30-40 minutes every six weeks or so.

 

Attending local events

Each year Romsey Labour runs a stall at the Mill Road Winter Fair and all the proceeds are donated to Romsey Mill.  This year we had a 'gorilla'

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 Helping people and our community:

  • with planning problems
  • we help with communications for people living in dire circumstances
  • we help with the design of local improvements
  • raising issues with council officers
  • we raise issues that are of major concern in regard to safety
  • we raise issues with the head of Cambridge's policing
  • we raise issues with the Police and Crime Commissioner
  •  

Supporting local and national causes and demonstrations 

Romsey Labour has a presence at most city events 

 

Anti Trump Rally outside Great St Mary    

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Kevin Price Labour's Candidate for Mayor speaking at the I Daniel Blake showing organised by Momentum and Unite

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Monthly ward meetings and mid monthly catch ups

We meet on the first Thursday of each month at 2000 at Ross Street Community Centre

Each month we also meet in the third week to catch up

On the third Friday in the month the whole of Cambridge's membership are invited to a Constituency meeting at Alex Wood Hall. This meeting is central to what happens within the constituency.

Noel wins on May 4th

This is your opportunity to make June, the end of May. Only by winning the local elections in May, and the General Election in June, can we achieve the fairer... Read more

There is a lot of misleading information about Labour's position on Brexit.  What is not misleading is Daniel Zeichner's stance - Daniel is firmly opposed to anything that involves Brexit, and has already proved this by his public stance and by his opposition in Parliament.

Jeremy's is often misrepresented and many people argue that his position of being 70% in favour of staying in was luke warm.  Since the referendum Jeremy has though followed the majority decision to leave.  For many people this has been a source of discontent, but for others his stance has been in line with the wishes of the people of the UK.  

However as Article 50 has moved through Parliament Jeremy has toughened Labour's stance, saying:

"From today, Labour's focus is on making sure this Tory Government guarantees the rights and protections we value most. As I said earlier, we cannot allow Britain to become a low-pay tax haven that only works for a few.

I will fight for real protection for the economy and the same benefits currently enjoyed within the single market. The UK needs to retain a strong relationship with our international partners, because important issues like climate change and cross-border crime cannot be tackled by one country in isolation."

Watch and share the video, calling on the Government to protect jobs, and rights for workers in every part of the UK.

http://www.labour.org.uk/share/article-50

 

 

Brexit and Labour

There is a lot of misleading information about Labour's position on Brexit.  What is not misleading is Daniel Zeichner's stance - Daniel is firmly opposed to anything that involves Brexit,... Read more

Cllr Kevin Price, Deputy Leader of Cambridge City Council, Executive Councillor for housing is Labour's candidate for Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

On Saturday 4th March Jeremy Corbyn came to Cambridge to support Kevin in his campaign

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Vote for Cllr Kevin Price who is standing for election as Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

Cllr Kevin Price, Deputy Leader of Cambridge City Council, Executive Councillor for housing is Labour's candidate for Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. On Saturday 4th March Jeremy Corbyn came to... Read more

9-3-18: Now we see the actual cost of Tory cuts to Children Services.  

The Fields, Children's Centre in Abbey will now be shutting at 1600 and will only operate during term time.  This is a first practical example of how the Tories are actually cutting back on front line services.

see also https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/fields-childrens-centre-funding-cuts-14378869

 

17-10-17: Sadly, the Tories on the County Council voted Labour down and passed the cuts to children's services. 

UPDATE 12-10-17

COME TO THE demonstration, it will be at 0930 am on Tuesday 17th October at the Shire Hall, Castle Hill, Cambridge.

Romsey Labour Party delivered a leaflet to every home in Romsey asking people to fill in the questionnaire on children's services; we also held two stalls outside the Coop talking to people about our campaign to keep Romsey Mill as a centre for children's services.  The County Council received over 2000 comments on their proposals and we are sure our efforts were in part responsible for such a huge response.  As a result the County Council have decided that this matter is too serious for the sub committee on children's services and will be taking the debate to full council on the 17th October.

We are yet to hear if the demonstration planned for the 10th will now be moved to the 17th.  Watch this space!

 

1-9-17: Romsey Labour fighting to save Children's Centres

We held another street stall outside the Coop at 1100 today to highlight the County Council's questionnaire on children's services.

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Daniel Zeichner MP joins Labour Councillors in fighting threats to ‘vital’ Children’s Centres

Labour's Sure Start initiative - a programme that brought hope, knowledge and resources to children and parents, recognising early years are crucial in ending disadvantage and inequality – is at risk from a threatened £1,000,000 cut to the Children’s Centres from the Tory-run County Council.  Labour County Councillors have come together with Daniel Zeichner MP to fight this. 

On 17 July, the County Council launched a consultation on the future of children’s centres across Cambridgeshire which would see three-quarters of its current centres facing the axe, including four in Cambridge. 

In Cambridge City the proposals would mean the loss of four current children’s centres at Romsey Mill, Fawcett, Homerton and Cherry Hinton.  Some wards in Cambridge are amongst the most deprived in the County and the proportion of children assessed as achieving a good level of development at the end of their Reception Year - seen as a key indicator for school readiness - is lower in Cambridge compared to most other areas of the County.

The Tories propose making £1m cuts in children’s centre services by using ‘flexible’ and ‘pop-up’ services in libraries and private homes in place of the dedicated and successful Sure Start children’s centres created by the Labour government.

At a public meeting held last Saturday (26 August) at Chesterton Community College the fight-back began with the launch of the County Labour Group’s campaign to 'Save Our Children's Centres'.

Daniel Zeichner MP joined Councillor Claire Richards (Castle), Councillor Jocelynne Scutt (Arbury ) and Councillor Elisa Meschini (King’s Hedges) to listen to residents’ concerns about the proposed changes.

Councillor Richards said: “These proposals would see the number of children’s centres across the county slashed to just a quarter of existing provision with four being lost in Cambridge.  The County Council’s own data shows how valued these centres are as places where young families can come together to access support services, improve their knowledge of parenting and help children develop their confidence and learning.  If we are serious about tackling inequality between the children of families in the greatest need and their peers and improving child and family health  we have to maintain our centres and not cloak closures under the pretence of remodelling and ‘pop up’ provision.”

Daniel Zeichner MP added: “Children’s Centres are a vital source of advice and practical support for families, especially disadvantaged families.  For all the government’s rhetoric on improving the life chances of all our children, no matter their background, the reality is that national spending cuts of almost 50% since 2010 have already meant the closure of hundreds of children’s centres and some services reduced to a skeleton level.”

The County Council consultation runs until Friday 22 September and details, together with the County’s data briefing, can be found here:  https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/children-and-families/children-s-centres/children-s-centres-consultation/

Further public meetings are planned, including one in Cherry Hinton on 2nd September led by Labour’s Councillor Sandra Crawford.  This will be at Cherry Hinton Library Hub from 2.00pm to 3.00pm.

This is an appeal to all Camaraderie readers to show your support for Children’s Centre services one of the Labour government’s proudest achievements.  Please help us to protest against these closures by responding to the consultation questionnaire (details above).

 

11th August Update

Romsey Mill are holding a number of consultations the dates and times that can be found here https://www.facebook.com/romseymillandcherryhintonchildrenscentre/photos/a.541878546001495.1073741828.541843396005010/733040356885312/?type=3&theater

 

 

The County Council are seeking to save a further £1 million on Children's Services in the next financial year - this comes on the heels of a £1.55 million cut in the last 3 years.

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As a lead into the cuts the County Council are making, they are holding a consultation on a re-arrangement and reduction of Children's Centres throughout the county.  The County and City Labour Party are opposing this change and are supported by Daniel Zeichner (our Labour MP).

 

5th August 

Romsey Labour organised an information stall outside the Coop on Saturday 5th August to highlight what was happening.

 romsey_mill_table3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also were handing out leaflets with the link to the consultation    

Part of this reduction in Children's Centres will mean Romsey Mill will no longer be a venue for County Council Services and there is every likelihood that Romsey Mill's team will no longer deliver the service that they have provided.  Many residents of Romsey and the wider city are more than aware of the excellence service that the team from Romsey Mill have provided and have been in touch with us to ask what can be done.

We are asking everyone to read the consultation document https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/news/consultation-starts-on-children-s-centre-proposals/

romsey_mill_table2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then we hope people will complete the actual consultation  

As a means of alerting people to the potential outcome of this consultation, I am asking if in reality this is 'a consultation on 'Children's Centres' or is this taking place as a cover to cut services?  I am doing this because people are questioning if the County Council will use this consultation to actually cut the service that is currently provided and not just the centres where services are being delivered.

One potential answer to that question is "Yes," because it seems unlikely that the County Council can save the £1 million they are planning to save from Children's Services if they don't cut services?

What I find amazing is that the proposal claims it will 'create family friendly services in the heart of the community'.  What I ask is Romsey Mill doing at present?  The services they provide are at the heart of our community and they are family friendly.  

One user of Romsey Mill has said the following:

“When I had my first child I didn’t have any parent friends and I felt so isolated. It was suggested that I visited the local children’s centre and that was where I found my community.

“It was a real safety net for me and I don’t know what I would have done without it".

Here in Romsey we will be campaigning against the proposed cuts to services and this page will be updated as we develop our strategy.  In the meantime you may wish to complete the consultation 

We are about to start a campaign in Romsey to defend children’s services, and because it is Romsey Mill we have a responsibility to represent an institution that may operate county wide but has its home is here in Romsey.

Some facts about Romsey Mill.

Romsey Mill’s Children’s Centre and staff have been contracted by the County Council to deliver support & services for families since 2008: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018.

Romsey Mill are also contracted to deliver services and support for Cherry Hinton Children’s Centre, but the majority of the staff are seconded from the County Council: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018. 

Romsey Mill are also contracted by the County Council to deliver Teenage Parents Support across the whole of Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire and this is funded via Children’s Centre’s: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018. 

No discussion took place with Romsey Mill about the current proposals or the consultation that was agreed by Cambridgeshire County Council’s Children’s & Young Committee on 11th July and went live on the 18th.

There is confusion about the relevance and accuracy of data and information and it is argued that some of this is misleading.

Romsey Mill are arguing that it is detrimental to the wellbeing of children and families to make further cuts to the funding of services to support the most vulnerable families in Cambridgeshire. 

Romsey Mill also recognises the current provision is preventative and that if early intervention is lost this will inevitably cost the County Council, and wider society, much more money as problems intensify and escalate and safeguarding, social care, police and health services are required to intercede later.

 

The County Council are seeking to save a further £1 million on Children's Services in the next financial year - this comes on the heels of a £1.55 million cut in the last 3 years.

As a lead in to the cuts the County Council are making they are holding a consultation on a re-arrangement and reduction of Children's Centres throughout the county.  The County and City Labour Party are opposing this change and are supported by Daniel Zeichner (our Labour MP).

 

Part of this reduction in Children's Centres will mean Romsey Mill will no longer be a venue for County Council Services and there is every likelihood that Romsey Mill's team will no longer deliver the service that they have provided.  Many residents of Romsey and the wider city are more than aware of the excellence service that the team from Romsey Mill have provided and have been in touch with us to ask what can be done.

Romsey_Mill.jpg

 

Well first, we are asking everyone to read the consultation document https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/news/consultation-starts-on-children-s-centre-proposals/

And then we hope people will complete the actual consultation  

As a means of alerting people to the potential outcome of this consultation, I am asking if in reality this is 'a consultation on 'Children's Centres' or is this taking place as a cover to cut services?  I am doing this because people are questioning if the County Council will use this consultation to actually cut the service that is currently provided and not just the centres where services are being delivered.

One potential answer to that question is "Yes," because it seems unlikely that the County Council can save the £1 million they are planning to save from Children's Services if they don't cut services?

What I find amazing is that the proposal claims it will 'create family friendly services in the heart of the community'.  What I ask is Romsey Mill doing at present?  The services they provide are at the heart of our community and they are family friendly.  

One user of Romsey Mill has said the following:

“When I had my first child I didn’t have any parent friends and I felt so isolated. It was suggested that I visited the local children’s centre and that was where I found my community.

“It was a real safety net for me and I don’t know what I would have done without it".

Here in Romsey we will be campaigning against the proposed cuts to services and this page will be updated as we develop our strategy.  In the meantime you may wish to complete the consultation 

We are about to start a campaign in Romsey to defend children’s services, and because it is Romsey Mill we have a responsibility to represent an institution that may operate county wide but has its home is here in Romsey.

Some facts about Romsey Mill.

Romsey Mill’s Children’s Centre and staff have been contracted by the County Council to deliver support & services for families since 2008: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018.

Romsey Mill are also contracted to deliver services and support for Cherry Hinton Children’s Centre, but the majority of the staff are seconded from the County Council: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018. 

Romsey Mill are also contracted by the County Council to deliver Teenage Parents Support across the whole of Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire and this is funded via Children’s Centre’s: the current contract ends on 31st March 2018. 

No discussion took place with Romsey Mill about the current proposals or the consultation that was agreed by Cambridgeshire County Council’s Children’s & Young Committee on 11th July and went live on the 18th.

There is confusion about the relevance and accuracy of data and information and it is argued that some of this is misleading.

Romsey Mill are arguing that it is detrimental to the wellbeing of children and families to make further cuts to the funding of services to support the most vulnerable families in Cambridgeshire. 

Romsey Mill also recognises the current provision is preventative and that if early intervention is lost this will inevitably cost the County Council, and wider society, much more money as problems intensify and escalate and safeguarding, social care, police and health services are required to intercede later.

One Mother has this to say about Romsey Mill Children's Services

“I first visited Romsey Mill when I was 17, and pregnant with my first child. I started antenatal there and it was a lifeline, I had no idea what to expect when I fell pregnant. I had no friends with children and was on my own. I learnt most of the things I know from Romsey Mill. The group was friendly and helpful. I was very isolated and had post natal depression and this was a huge lifeline. They would pick me up and take us to group. The family workers helped me no end with various things , benefits , housing, relationships , other organisations. I then went on to have a second child and stayed on at Romsey Mill by doing courses , such as maths , English , first aid etc . It was a great help for my confidence and to gain some kind of education whilst having free childcare . I also kept and made a lot of friends.”

 

 

The consultation on Children's Services

9-3-18: Now we see the actual cost of Tory cuts to Children Services.   The Fields, Children's Centre in Abbey will now be shutting at 1600 and will only operate during... Read more

20th November 2017

The plans for the renovation of the pavement outside the Coop are now with the planning committee.  

http://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=OYDQU3DXGDA00

 

 

 

Your Romsey Councillors have worked hard to develop a plan for improving the site at the end of Cavendish Road and outside the Coop.  The agreement comes after a number of meetings in which local stakeholders views were taken on board and a public consultation.  

Both sites will have an underlying railway theme to celebrate the considerable part that Romsey played housing the people who managed, maintained and provided a rail service from Cambridge.

This has taken a long time - in fact at a meeting of the East Area Committee in 2013, before he was elected, Dave Baigent publicly argued 'it would seem appropriate to provide one or more meeting points and the idea of a town square involving quality paving and seating'.

Plans are also going ahead to commission a piece of art to go on the site at the end of Cavendish Road.

An artists impression of the site outside the Coop.

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An artist's impression of the site at the end of Cavendish Road

 

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PLANS for renovations outside the Coop and at the end of Cavendish Road

20th November 2017 The plans for the renovation of the pavement outside the Coop are now with the planning committee.   http://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=OYDQU3DXGDA00       Your Romsey Councillors have worked...

NEWS RELEASE

 

30 January, 2017

 

 

COUNCIL WELCOMES NEW DATA SHOWING CAMBRIDGE’S CONTINUED STRENGTHS, BUT MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND LIVING WAGE NEEDED TO END ‘TALE OF TWO CITIES’

CAMBRIDGE City Council has welcomed the annual UK cities comparison report published today by the Centre for Cities think tank, which shows that Cambridge continues to shine among UK cities in terms of skills, innovation and economic growth. 

 

But the council also says that the latest data on housing affordability and local income inequality shows that the February Government Housing White Paper needs to do far more to help the council and its partners provide Cambridge housing that is affordable and meets the needs of people who earn average incomes but still cannot afford to live in the area.

 

Using new data, the report also suggests Cambridge is the most “unequal” UK city in terms of income distribution, emphasising the importance of the council’s Living Wage campaign and the need for local businesses and organisations to work with the council to ensure fair pay, so local people can afford rising housing costs and prosperity is shared more fairly.

 

The Centre for Cities’ new report, ‘Cities Outlook 2017’ is the latest of their series of annual reports that provide hard evidence of how cities are performing across a range of key facts.  Once again, Cambridge has come out as one of the UK’s leading cities for skills, innovation and economic growth.

  • Cambridge is confirmed as the most innovative city in the UK, with 341 patent applications per 100,000 of population. The Cambridge Phenomenon is thriving.
  • Cambridge remains the UK city with the most highly qualified workforce too, with 66.5% of the population having high level qualifications.
  • Unemployment overall is second best in the country at 0.7%.
  • Cambridge also has one of the fastest growing populations, up 1.9% from last year’s figures to 130,900 due to the high rate of new housing locally.
  • However, house prices are still third highest in the country, with the average cost of Cambridge house prices quoted at £475,820.  Crucially, despite real wages having gone up 3.2% in the last year, and record levels of local house building, housing affordability remains third worst among UK cities.
  • For the first time, this year’s report also indicates how reliant each city is on trade with the European Union.  50% of Cambridge’s exports currently go to the EU, which shows the importance of that market.

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “We welcome this latest report and the fresh evidence it provides, including on how well Cambridge is performing compared to other cities.  It is great to know that Cambridge people remain the most highly skilled, and Cambridge businesses are the most innovative in the UK.

 

“However, housing affordability remains at crisis levels. The extra £70m we have secured from Government for new council housing through the devolution deal will help us provide over 500 Cambridge families with new council homes in the next five years.  And the £100m for affordable housing across the whole devolution area will benefit people who want to live and work in Cambridge including a high proportion of extra Housing Association housing in neighbouring South Cambridgeshire.  

“We need to continue to add more affordable housing, both for rent and purchase if we are to fully address affordability issues as our economy and population grows.

“We will also continue our campaign to secure a real Living Wage for all Cambridge workers, and work with employers to address income inequality.  Housing is a major cause of the cost of living in the city, and we urge all employers to recognise that and pay the Living Wage.  All local employers have a role to end what is a modern day ‘Tale of Two Cities’, playing their part in addressing the inequality that exists in our great city.”

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors

  1. You can read the full report on the Centre For Cities website here:http://www.centreforcities.org/publication/cities-outlook-2017/

 

  1. Contacts 

    Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email: lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email: tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email: castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email:antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk,

tel: 01223 457001

Cambridge reported as still being a Tale of Two Cities

NEWS RELEASE   30 January, 2017     COUNCIL WELCOMES NEW DATA SHOWING CAMBRIDGE’S CONTINUED STRENGTHS, BUT MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND LIVING WAGE NEEDED TO END ‘TALE OF TWO CITIES’...

Cambridge Street Aid – Helping People On The Street To Turn A Corner


There are lots of reasons why people beg on the street. Each person has their own story to tell, and mostly it'll be one we can sympathise with.

Many of us instinctively want to give money to people we think need our help, and it feels more personal when you give to someone directly.  But have you ever wondered whether you are really helping? 

csa-poster-orange-A2-v5-hires.jpgIn the view of leading charities the evidence is clear. At best your act of kindness will do no harm. At worst, and all too often, your money will get spent on drink or drugs and may help to perpetuate a miserable life which often only ends in premature death. 

It may also surprise you to know that the link between begging and having nowhere to live is not always strong.  Of course there are genuinely homeless people on the street, most of whom have very complex needs.  But many rough sleepers refuse to beg while many of the people begging have somewhere to stay.  Some even have their own tenancy.  No one needs to beg to get into a hostel: Cambridge homelessness hostels are free to enter and eligible people can claim housing benefit to meet the cost.

‎What you do with your own money is your business.  But if you don’t want to gamble on whether you may be doing more harm than good, a clear choice is to donate to Cambridge Street Aid.

Cambridge Street Aid is a fund where every penny you donate will go directly into helping to end the waste and misery of a life spent on the streets.  You can also be sure that your money will add to, not substitute for, the help provided by statutory and charitable organisations described on these pages.  Support workers, homelessness charities and other community groups can bid into the fund for things that will make a real difference to people’s lives; the only limitation being that it must help a person get off, or stay off, the streets.

So, now you don’t have to gamble when you give what will your choice be:  Loose change or REAL change?    

Cambridge Street Aid is administered by the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation.  To find out more, or to make a donation, please visit the Cambridge Street Aid page.

Cambridge Street Aid

Cambridge Street Aid – Helping People On The Street To Turn A Corner There are lots of reasons why people beg on the street. Each person has their own story...

28-10-16

Planning Inspectorate Appeal Decision

 

 Appeal Decision 

Hearing held on 23 August 2016 

Site visit made on 23 August 2016 

by Roy Merrett BSc(Hons) DipTP MRTPI 

an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government 

Decision date: 27 October 2016 

 

 Appeal Ref: APP/Q0505/W/16/3145912 

Land to the rear of 27 - 37 Romsey Terrace, Cambridge CB1 3NH 

 

 The appeal is made under section 78 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 against a failure to give notice within the prescribed period of a decision on an application for planning permission. 

 

 

 The appeal is made by Robinson College against Cambridge City Council. 

 

 

 The application Ref 15/2355/FUL, is dated 1 August 2014. 

 The development proposed is four dwellings – two semi-detached three bedroom dwellings and two semi-detached two bedroom dwellings and associated amenity space and facilitating development. 

 

 

 Decision 

1. The appeal is dismissed.

 

30-04-16

Romsey Labour shared residents’ disbelief this week on hearing that the central government inspectors are ignoring local requests for a hearing in Cambridge.

Having already seen the developers decide to exploit a loophole in order to take matters out of local hands (http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Decision-Robinson-College-8216-garden-grab-8217/story-29159898-detail/story.html), we had hoped that at least the government inspectors would come to Cambridge to hear submissions from residents, councillors and officers. This was especially the case since East Area Committee (made up of all councillors from Romsey, Abbey, Petersfield and Coleridge) fully supported residents’ request for the inspectors to come to Cambridge, and officers made this known to the inspectors. We are therefore disappointed that there is currently a danger that the case will be decided by written submissions only.

Sophie Barnett, Romsey Labour’s City Council candidate for May 2016, has taken a keen interest in this issue, and is fully supportive of residents’ concerns. She says, “Just like when the external inspector overturned the Council’s decision on the McClaren’s development, this is another example of a planning decision being made by a centrally-appointed inspector rather than democratically-elected councillors. Local residents, in Romsey Terrace and across the City, have many concerns about this development and should be given the chance to present these to the inspector, especially since they have been denied the chance to have their views heard at a Development Control Forum.”

Romsey Labour councillors are working with residents to persuade the inspectorate to change their mind. We will keep you informed on this page.

9-3-16

The Development Control Forum planned for today has been cancelled by Robinson College and they have gone straight to appeal.


In doing this they have first stopped the negotiations taking place with Cambridge City Council Planners.

Second, they have cancelled discussions aimed to find a joint solution by the Development Control Forum which was to take place between them and the residents association in Romsey Terrace.

Third, I hope this is not how the elected representatives on the City Council and the Officers are going to treated in the future? 

1-3-16

This proposal by Robinson College continues with another plan due to go to the Development Control Forum on 9-3-16.  Local councillors are supporting the residents association in this.

15-1-16

We have again met with the residents association and advised them on how they may continue to challenge the development.

20-3-15

"Well I suppose we never really thought this planning application would reflect the view of residents - but we are disappointed that it ignored our views completely"

A quote from a local resident about the 'new' plans by Robinson College for Romsey Terrace sums it all up.  Robinson College's latest PR exercise was hardly glitzy but it was a charm offensive with four very pleasant people helping visitors to 'understand'.

The new plans though were little different to the earlier plans that were withdrawn and represent a gross overdevelopment.  The best thing really is for Robinson College to sit down with residents and try to talk this through.

 

30-9-14

Cllr. Dave Baigent signed the petition against this development on Saturday.

 

15-8-14

Plans have now been submitted for the proposed development of five dwellings - two semi-detached three-bedroom dwellings and three terraces two-bedroom dwellings and associated amenity space and facilitating development.

Romsey_terrace.jpg

It is likely that this application will be amongst the first to go to the new centralised planning arrangements that were a feature of Labours May 2014 Manifesto.  

I WILL, as promised, be asking for this development to be rejected.

 

More details can be found by going to the council's planning pages at https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications// and entering Romsey Terrace

 

31-7-14

For a moment it appeared that Robinson College's plans to develop accommodation the car park in Romsey Terrace were on hold, but now the issue has come alive again after residents discovered that agents were resubmitting plans and trying to limit the amount of time for objections. 

A meeting was quickly called by residents and Dave attended along with 10 other local people.

Serious concerns were raised at the meeting about some of the communications between council officers and the agents and these can be found at https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=N33RA8DX3E000 .  There is a lot of documentation here, but people who are involved in objecting may find it beneficial to take the time to read through all of them.

Dave was able to suggest that the campaigners should

  1. try to step up their public campaign,  
  2. ask to meet with the Master and Fellows of Robinson College
  3. take their concerns to East Area Committee.

Roy Stamp is coordinating the action plan and your labour councillors remain ready to help.

 

IMG_3365.jpg Two of the three residents I met with (23-4-14) 

Round One to the residents of Romsey Terrace  (9-5-14)

There were over 20 objections, by letter, by email or online to the planning application by Robinson College for Romsey Terrace.  They came from concerned residents, mainly in Romsey Terrace and Coleridge Road.

Clearly, residents have made an impact and achieved a great result as the planning officer is going to recommend refusal of this application, which is a great result.

  

25-4-15

Dave was appalled at the lack of consideration shown by Robinson College for you and the impact on your lives by their proposal.  On the other hand it was impressive to see the way your community acted together, to register complaints and attend the meeting on the 24-4-14 to make your voices heard.

I will continue to keep watch on developments in case there is an appeal, or if other applications are made on this site. If this happens, I will meet with residents again to get your opinions.

I must add that it was impressive to see the way your community acted together to make your voices heard by attending the meeting on the 24-4-14 and registering objections.  I was equally appalled at the lack of consideration shown by Robinson College for you and the impact on your lives by their proposal.  

If I get elected on May 22nd I will continue to stand alongside you in your campaign and under Labour's proposed arrangements for planning I all be able to represent your views.

My campaigns against inappropriate and over-development on Cromwell and Mill Road are both very visible examples of what I am capable of achieving. I am a doer, which is something I've learned from a lifetime of public service.

Politics needs some new faces and I hope you can recognise my sincerity in wanting to be one of those.  If elected I will continue to listen and to represent the voice of Romsey because only by doing that will I fulfil my pledge, which is to work hard to make the ‘town’ where I live a better place.

  Dave

28-4-14

Dave was invited to an open meeting on Monday (28-4-14) at the Deaf Centre in Romsey Terrace by residents concerned about plans by Robinson College to build 10 flats on a car park and a grassed area.

"I am so glad that I went because there were 40 plus people there who all were very concerned about their loss of car parking space and the extra housing in a road already full." 

This looks like another one of those land grabbing projects that will make money for the owners and fill in another small open space.  How long will it be before the council actually wake up to the fact that these sort of planning applications are not just for 2014 but taking away important spaces in Romsey for ever with all the loss that means for us and our environment? 

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The owner of the land is actually Robinson College and they are just acting like speculators - where is their moral compass?

Why is it that Robinson College thinks its OK to take away a car park and a green space to put in more accommodation?  I don't think it is to house their students. I am told that the college want to get planning permission and then sell the land.  If this is right then its about profit and the market is not taking care of residents needs but putting money in developers and Robinson College's pockets.

The LibDem manifesto talks about 'ensuring the city retains its compact character surrounded by green belt' but at what stage will they call a halt?  When will enough be enough? 

I share the residents concerns and will support them. 

 

 

Inspector turns down Robinson College's plans for Romsey Terrace

28-10-16 Planning Inspectorate Appeal Decision    Appeal Decision  Hearing held on 23 August 2016  Site visit made on 23 August 2016  by Roy Merrett BSc(Hons) DipTP MRTPI  an Inspector appointed... Read more

TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON RIVER MOORINGS

A TWELVE-WEEK consultation on proposals to change the way Cambridge City Council manages moorings alongside its land by the River Cam gets under way on 27 October.

The consultation invites views on a number of elements of the council’s approach to moorings. 

As well as being a treasured feature of the city, the Cam has become one of the busiest inland waterways in the UK and is a popular destination for a wide range of recreational activities. 

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The council has already listened to the views of a number of river boat dwellers through public questions at committee and at full council meetings.

It wishes to apologise to those people who felt the first draft of the consultation document, considered at committee, was not sufficiently clear, and who thought it gave an inaccurate picture of those living on the river. 

The council fully recognises the community of people living on the river and their contribution to Cambridge society, and wishes to engage positively with them, and with other river users, in setting future moorings policy.

The consultation document seeks to make very clear the council’s intention to support those people who live on the river, not only during the consultation but through its services delivered day to day. 

The consultation asks river users, residents and others to give views on a series of proposals including:

Basing mooring licence fees on boat length

The council currently charges a licence fee irrespective of boat length. Previous consultations have shown boaters with smaller vessels believe this to be unfair and research shows that in other parts of the country there are different fees according to boat length.

Responding to safety concerns by stopping mooring at the Riverside wall

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A number of options have been reviewed in the past but no feasible solution has been found to provide cost-effective, safe access to and from moored boats and the adjoining river wall on this part of the river. Residents have rightly expressed concern, and the consultation seeks to consider how the council could mitigate the impact on those currently using the area. Any boat we have regulated to moor at Riverside wall which has people living aboard will be offered alternative moorings on the Cam and will not lost their home.

Reviewing the fees charged for mooring on council land

The council has previously committed to reviewing fees and charges to ensure that they are fair. Charges should not only cover the costs of operating the mooring service, but make a contribution to the services provided by the council to the wider Cambridge community.

 

The location, type and number of mooring berths, provision for visitor moorings and penalties for those who overstay, a revised enforcement policy and ways of managing mooring waiting lists are among other topics covered in the consultation.

Cllr Richard Robertson, Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources, said: “This is an open consultation and no outcomes have been assumed or decisions made. Every comment we receive will be carefully considered and used to inform and shape the final policy, which will be presented to councillors.

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“We are absolutely committed to listening to people’s views and to working closely with all those directly affected by these proposals. 

“It’s really important that we have a clear and transparent approach to moorings because the Cam is a very busy waterway and an important part of our city environment.

“This consultation is about being open and fair to boaters, residents and other river users.”

A report is set to be presented to Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee on 23 March informing councillors about the outcomes of the consultation and the council’s revised River Cam moorings policy.

The consultation will run until 20 January and details will be published on the council’s website at www.cambridge.gov.uk. Printed details are available by calling Tracy Okten on 01223 457478.

The consultation began on 27 October and will ask river users, residents and others to put forward their views on a number of proposals including:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation on Moorings Management Policy

TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON RIVER MOORINGS A TWELVE-WEEK consultation on proposals to change the way Cambridge City Council manages moorings alongside its land by the River Cam gets...

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