News

WHAT A WONDERFUL RESULT FOR LABOUR and DANIEL

IN Romsey we did particularly well for Labour.  We achieved a record 82% turnout and the following results
Greens 110
Tories 578
Libs 1289
Labour a stonking 2989 which gave Daniel a 60% vote

 

Election Candidate Party Votes %  
 Daniel Zeichner Labour 29032 52% Elected
 Julian Leon Huppert Liberal Democrat 16371 29% Not elected
 John Hayward Conservative 9133 16% Not elected
 Stuart James Tuckwood Green Party 1265 2% Not elected
 Keith Alexander Garrett Rebooting Democracy 133 0% Not elected

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-6-17 Jeremy's Latest speech in Gateshead

Jeremy Corbyn song

 

26-5-17 After the very sad events in Manchester Labour's campaign resumes watch Jeremy's speech Here Read it Here

A whole host of videos by Jeremy

Read what Labour are actually offering in their Manifesto  

See the videos

1 millionhomes https://t.co/oixB4Scb0U

Protecting the weak https://t.co/3O5zJuTAXu

Saving the nhs https://t.co/SSu37de6ym

Standing up for the many not the few https://t.co/G7ecSbBbIh

Keir Starmer on European workers https://t.co/dk6bPbYETN

Read this from Jeremy 26-5-17

Today, as Labour resumes campaigning in the General Election, I wanted to reach out to you, as a member of our party — and of our Labour family.

Our nation has been united in shock and grief. But as I watched thousands of people coming together in Albert Square in Manchester, I saw unwavering defiance too.

This attack sought to divide us, and instead we sent a powerful message of solidarity and of love. We saw so much evidence of our humanity: from the people we ask to protect us in the emergency services; from those who rushed towards the carnage to comfort the dying or offered lifts home and places to stay; from those gathered the following day in Albert Square.

So for the rest of this election campaign all of us need to stand together and we need to stand up for democracy.

Because when we talk about British values, including tolerance and mutual support, democracy is at the very heart of them.

And our General Election campaigns are the centrepieces of our democracy — rallies, debates, campaigning in marketplaces, knocking on doors, listening to people on their streets, at their workplaces and in their homes.

So many of you are already a part of this incredible campaign. If you'd like to join us this weekend you can sign up here.

Together, we will be stronger. Together we can build a Britain worthy of those who died and those who have inspired us all in Manchester this week.

Thank you.

Jeremy Corbyn
Leader of the Labour Party

  

 

JEREMY SAID 29TH APRIL 2017

As leader he said he had forced the government into U-turns on tax credits, disability payments and attempts to increase national insurance for the self-employed. 

On his leadership philosophy, he said his critics had a right to make a reasoned case and challenge leadership. If leaders go unchallenged, they can make some of the most damaging mistakes, he said. ”And if party leaders put themselves ahead of serving the people, they stop listening and even put our country at risk.”

He warned there are signs of the prime minister and her closest advisers are slipping into a presidential bunker mentality. “Whereas it is the job of leadership to hold open the space for dissent, new thinking and fit-for-purpose policy,” he said.

He added: “Whereas insecure leaders want to feel stronger by asking you to give them more power. I recognise strong leadership as equipping you with more power.”

He said he would not allow free thinking to be “shut down by a hostile media or an elite that scoffs at anyone who dares to step out of line”.

He used the speech to make a plea for 2.4 million young people missing from the UK’s electoral register to sign up. He said barely 40% of 18- to 24-year olds turn out to vote.

“The Conservatives are more than happy with this state of affairs. Apathy and resignation will secure them seats on election day,” he said.

 

 

A message from our MP Daniel Zeichner

Your chance to say “No More” to the most right-wing Conservative government in modern history

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Two days ago, shortly after Theresa May’s announcement, our MP Daniel Zeichner sent this email to Labour members in Cambridge.  For those readers who will not have received it, here it is in full:

As you will be aware, today Prime Minster Theresa May has announced her intention, less than two years after the last election, to hold another General Election on Thursday 8 June.

This is an election like no other.  We are faced with the most right-wing Conservative Government in modern history – a ruling party taken over by Euro-sceptics, and one that has shown an exceptionally cruel streak towards the young, the old, the poor and those with a disability.  This election is your chance to say: no more!

I have been your MP for nearly two years.  In that time, I have run countless surgeries and campaigns, attended hundreds of community events, worked with local councillors, trade unions and campaign groups and met thousands of residents.  I have shown that a Labour MP can and does make a positive difference to people’s lives. In the same way, a Labour Government will give all of us in Britain a far better future.

During my time as your MP, I have always put the interests of the people of our diverse and beautiful city first, ahead of the games in Westminster:  I stood in 2015 because of the contempt shown by the Coalition to ordinary working people; and I voted and argued consistently against leaving the EU.

In this election, the candidate for the Liberal Democrats in Cambridge will be the politician who lost the seat in 2015.  The choice is clear: do people want a representative who backed a Tory Government, or do they want an MP who will never side with the heartless Tories who, since 2010, have damaged our country so much?

Daniel Zeichner

Jeremy Says (Edited from the Guardian Article) 

Jeremy Corbyn 

Is pledging to bust the “cosy cartel” of British politics as he insists Labour is poised to form the next government.

“Much of the media and establishment are saying this election is a foregone conclusion,” he will say.“They think there are rules in politics, which if you don’t follow by doffing your cap to powerful people, accepting that things can’t really change, then you can’t win.

“They say I don’t play by the rules – their rules. We can’t win, they say, because we don’t play their game. They’re quite right I don’t. And a Labour government elected on 8 June won’t play by their rules.

He will say that fatcat bosses and corporations should be afraid of a Labour victory. 

“If I were Southern Rail or Philip Green [chairman of Arcadia Group], I’d be worried about a Labour government.”

“If I were Mike Ashley [chairman of Sports Direct] or the CEO of a tax-avoiding multinational corporation, I’d want to see a Tory victory. Labour is the party that will put the interests of the majority first.”

 “When we win, it’s the people – not the powerful – who win. The nurse, the teacher, the small trader, the carer, the builder, the office worker win. We all win.”

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 Jeremy Corbyn: general election is about ‘future of all of us’

The Labour leader made a symbolic visit to Croydon Central, the seat of housing minister Gavin Barwell, on Wednesday, to underline his ambition to “prove the establishment experts wrong,” and snatch seats from the Conservatives.

Labour hopes to steer the debate to the state of the economy, living standards, schools and the NHS – while prime minister Theresa May has repeatedly presented it as a test of her leadership against Corbyn’s.

May flew to Bolton North East on Wednesday night by helicopter, to speak to an audience of activists. 

Downing Street said she plans to meet as many voters as she can once the campaign kicks off, rather than sticking to the carefully stage-managed events that characterised the failed remain campaign in last year’s EU referendum. 

“It’s going to be all about meeting people, knocking on doors, having those personal conversations,” said a No 10 source, adding that the campaign would have “its own unique feel”.

Labour categorically ruled out entering a coalition with the Scottish National party on Wednesday, after SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said she was willing to consider a “progressive alliance” to take on the Tories.

Former Labour leader Ed Miliband was relentlessly pilloried by the Conservatives as the puppet of the SNP during the 2015 election campaign, and Corbyn is keen to avoid constant speculation about the makeup of potential coalitions.

Speaking on Wednesday afternoon, Corbyn said, “There will be no coalition deal with the SNP and a Labour government.” 

He added that he did not consider Nicola Sturgeon’s party to be progressive, because it had passed on Tory spending cuts in Scotland.

“The SNP may talk left at Westminster, but in government in Scotland it acts right,” he said.

 

Jeremy says it as it is - the fatcats are ruggt to be afeaud of Labour
"Much of the media and establishment are saying this election is a foregone conclusion," he will say. "They think there are rules in politics, which if you don't follow by doffing your cap to powerful people, accepting that things can't really change, then you can't win. "They say I don't play by the rules - their rules. We can't win, they say, because we don't play their game. They're quite right I don't. And a Labour government elected on 8 June won't play by their rules." He will say that fatcat bosses and corporations should be afraid of a Labour victory. "If I were Southern Rail or Philip Green [chairman of Arcadia Group], I'd be worried about a Labour government." "If I were Mike Ashley [chairman of Sports Direct] or the CEO of a tax-avoiding multinational corporation, I'd want to...

Free School Meals for all primary children - paid for by introducing VAT on private school fees

Angela Rayner tells us (6-3-17)

I have been up since 5am, we have announced that we would introduce free school meals for all primary school children by introducing VAT on private school fees to pay for it. I have arrived in media city to start a full day talking through our plan starting with Good Morning Britain, then BBC Breakfast Sofa, Today Programme, Five Live and others to be confirmed. Then I will travel to Lancashire to meet up with the leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn MP to formally announce the policy. Here is my statement to the media.

Today at an after school club in Leyland, Lancashire, Jeremy Corbyn and I will announce that the next Labour government will guarantee free school meals for all primary school children. By introducing VAT on private school fees Labour will level the playing field between children. Only 7 per cent of children in England attend private school. VAT on private school fees will raise at least £1.3bn, enabling us to fully fund this policy. Labour’s policy will benefit the education and health of all children by ending a subsidy to the privileged few. I’m a mum and I hate the thought of any child going a whole day at school without a healthy meal.

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Four million children in Britain are living in poverty – and because of rising in-work poverty, many do not qualify for free school meals under the existing system. Children who eat a healthy lunch do better at school – research has proven that offering universal access to free school meals enables primary school pupils to advance by around two months on average. Give children healthy food and they behave better at school, concentrate more in class and perform better in exams. As a parent I don’t see any downside.

Britain faces a serious health crisis linked to a poor diet – almost 20 per cent of children are obese by the time they leave primary school at 11. There is a real need to address these health problems. We as a nation cannot be satisfied with our children suffering health problems through no fault of their own.

Labour’s policy will help improve the health of our children by making sure every child gets given a nutritious meal at school – over 90 per cent of pupils taking a school lunch eat food or drink containing vegetables or fruit compared with only 58 per cent of pupils bringing in packed lunches. It is right and proper that we aim to ensure every child is receiving a healthy, balanced lunch at school.

Despite these huge benefits, the government is failing to provide children their basic right to a healthy meal. In 2013, the Coalition Government accepted a report that recommended all primary school pupils get free school meals. However, as is usually the case with this government, the plan was quietly dropped. Instead, since 2014, children in reception, year one and year two get free school meals – but funding per child per meal has been frozen, therefore failing to keep up with inflation.

The Conservatives are leading an assault on our country’s schools. The serious funding crisis currently looming over schools has not only left them unable to provide healthy lunches for pupils, but has forced schools like St John’s Primary School in Crowborough to resort to extreme measures such as asking parents to donate essential items – like toilet rolls – that the school can’t afford. It’s simply unacceptable. Our children deserve better and Labour will make sure that’s what they get.

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As Shadow Education Secretary, I’ve had enough of seeing schools struggling to provide the support and education children need because of the misplaced priorities of this Conservative government. Free school meals for all children, no matter what their background, will improve the education and health of our children. Labour will deliver it.

The General Election

WHAT A WONDERFUL RESULT FOR LABOUR and DANIEL IN Romsey we did particularly well for Labour.  We achieved a record 82% turnout and the following resultsGreens 110Tories 578Libs 1289Labour a...

This is your opportunity to make June, the end of May.

Only by winning the local elections in May, and the General Election in June, can we achieve the fairer society we want to see in Britain and the world. 

The Labour Party has less than weeks to save Britain. We have 7 weeks to elect a Labour Government that will protect us from an ideologically-driven Tory Hard Brexit, protect the vulnerable and save our public services (such as NHS, Welfare, Education and Emergency Services.  Only Labour will build the much needed homes so that people have a proper roof over their heads.


Join us tomorrow in our canvass sessions by contacting Dave or help out with our leaflet delivery by contacting Liz

Of interest to Romsey

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Our Candidate for the County Council elections in May Noel Kavanagh (currently county councillor for Coleridge) with City Councillors Anna Smith, Dave Baigent

Read Labour's Annual Report to its residents

Labour's Plans for the County Council

  • Reduce congestion and pollution, abolish the park and ride charge

Create a city centre ‘Clean Air Zone’ restore the city centre shuttle bus and deliver the Addenbrookes railway statio

  • Improve roads, pavements and safety
    • Set up a £10m urban repairs fund and reduce Tory dimming of Cambridge’s streetlights 
  • Tackle the housing crisis
    • Deliver 500 council houses and make the County Council a housing developer to build affordable home 
  • Fight poverty and end the social care crisis
    • Create a county-wide Living Wage Campaign, invest nearly £11m in children’s and adult social care to reduce the burden on the NHS 
  • Protect education and libraries
    • Build a brand-new secondary school in Cambridge, keep libraries in public hands, and reverse the £325 cut to library books
  • Reduce congestion and pollution, abolish the park and ride charge
    • Create a city centre ‘Clean Air Zone’ restore the city centre shuttle bus and deliver the Addenbrookes railway station 
  • Improve roads, pavements and safety
    • Set up a £10m urban repairs fund and reduce Tory dimming of Cambridge’s streetlights 
  • Tackle the housing crisis
    • Deliver 500 council houses and make te County Council a housing developer to build affordable homes 
  • Fight poverty and end the social care crisis
    • Create a county-wide Living Wage Campaign, invest nearly £11m in children’s and adult social care to reduce the burden on the NHS
  • Protect education and libraries
  • Build a brand-new secondary school in Cam ridge, keep libraries in public hands, and reverse the £325 cut to library books

 

Romsey Labour are here to represent the people of Romsey and to do this we have to know what they want.  There are a number of ways this is done:

  • we knock on peoples doors and talk to them (canvassing). 
  • we hold meet and great stalls (mainly outside the Coop on Mill Road)
  • we attend local events (we run a stall at The Winter Fair and the proceeds are donated to Romsey Mill).
  • we live in the area
  • we deliver leaflets about our work
  • we answer emails, letters and telephone calls
  • we support local and national causes and demonstrations
  • we hold monthly ward meetings and mid monthly catch ups

In outcome we hope to help people and our community

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Canvassing

We aim to knock on everyone's door at least three times a year and whilst this does not mean we meet everyone it gives us a clear idea of the important issues in Romsey.  For most of the year this is carried out on a Saturday or Sunday when we go out as a group to target specific roads.  As we get closer to elections we increase our door knocking to a point when we are out everyday. Canvassers include our four councillors and members of the Romsey Labour Party and training is given to anyone who wants to join us.  Without this important contact we would not be able to do our job properly and we always need more people to help.

People often think that canvassing is stressful, but its not like that at all.  Almost without exception people in Romsey recognise the need for politicians to talk to the public and are prepared to take part in short debates on their doorstep.  People appreciate rather than resent these interactions and when they are busy they politely say so.  This week we canvassed in Great Eastern Street.

 Canvassing in the spring

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 Canvassing in the winter

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Meet and great stalls

You will probably have seen us outside the Coop on a Saturday morning.  Sometimes we are there with a special message, often about a local issue or the NHS.  We try to do this once a month and it is a very good way of taking the pulse in Romsey.

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Leaflets

Most of you will have seen our leaflets.  In these we try to capture national, citywide and local issues.  As we get closer to the election the amount of leaflets increase and they provide a way for Labour to set out its stall.  We always need help in delivering leaflets so please get in touch if you can spare 30-40 minutes every six weeks or so.

 

Attending local events

Each year Romsey Labour runs a stall at the Mill Road Winter Fair and all the proceeds are donated to Romsey Mill.  This year we had a 'gorilla'

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 Helping people and our community:

  • with planning problems
  • we help with communications for people living in dire circumstances
  • we help with the design of local improvements
  • raising issues with council officers
  • we raise issues that are of major concern in regard to safety
  • we raise issues with the head of Cambridge's policing
  • we raise issues with the Police and Crime Commissioner
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Supporting local and national causes and demonstrations 

Romsey Labour has a presence at most city events 

 

Anti Trump Rally outside Great St Mary    

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Kevin Price Labour's Candidate for Mayor speaking at the I Daniel Blake showing organised by Momentum and Unite

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Monthly ward meetings and mid monthly catch ups

We meet on the first Thursday of each month at 2000 at Ross Street Community Centre

Each month we also meet in the third week to catch up

On the third Friday in the month the whole of Cambridge's membership are invited to a Constituency meeting at Alex Wood Hall. This meeting is central to what happens within the constituency.

Noel wins on May 4th

This is your opportunity to make June, the end of May. Only by winning the local elections in May, and the General Election in June, can we achieve the fairer... Read more

There is a lot of misleading information about Labour's position on Brexit.  What is not misleading is Daniel Zeichner's stance - Daniel is firmly opposed to anything that involves Brexit, and has already proved this by his public stance and by his opposition in Parliament.

Jeremy's is often misrepresented and many people argue that his position of being 70% in favour of staying in was luke warm.  Since the referendum Jeremy has though followed the majority decision to leave.  For many people this has been a source of discontent, but for others his stance has been in line with the wishes of the people of the UK.  

However as Article 50 has moved through Parliament Jeremy has toughened Labour's stance, saying:

"From today, Labour's focus is on making sure this Tory Government guarantees the rights and protections we value most. As I said earlier, we cannot allow Britain to become a low-pay tax haven that only works for a few.

I will fight for real protection for the economy and the same benefits currently enjoyed within the single market. The UK needs to retain a strong relationship with our international partners, because important issues like climate change and cross-border crime cannot be tackled by one country in isolation."

Watch and share the video, calling on the Government to protect jobs, and rights for workers in every part of the UK.

http://www.labour.org.uk/share/article-50

 

 

Brexit and Labour

There is a lot of misleading information about Labour's position on Brexit.  What is not misleading is Daniel Zeichner's stance - Daniel is firmly opposed to anything that involves Brexit,... Read more

Cllr Kevin Price, Deputy Leader of Cambridge City Council, Executive Councillor for housing is Labour's candidate for Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

On Saturday 4th March Jeremy Corbyn came to Cambridge to support Kevin in his campaign

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Vote for Cllr Kevin Price who is standing for election as Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

Cllr Kevin Price, Deputy Leader of Cambridge City Council, Executive Councillor for housing is Labour's candidate for Mayor of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. On Saturday 4th March Jeremy Corbyn came to... Read more

Your Romsey Councillors have worked hard to develop a plan for improving the site at the end of Cavendish Road and outside the Coop.  The agreement comes after a number of meetings in which local stakeholders views were taken on board and a public consultation.  

Both sites will have an underlying railway theme to celebrate the considerable part that Romsey played housing the people who managed, maintained and provided a rail service from Cambridge.

This has taken a long time - in fact at a meeting of the East Area Committee in 2013, before he was elected, Dave Baigent publicly argued 'it would seem appropriate to provide one or more meeting points and the idea of a town square involving quality paving and seating'.

Plans are also going ahead to commission a piece of art to go on the site at the end of Cavendish Road.

An artists impression of the site outside the Coop.

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An artist's impression of the site at the end of Cavendish Road

 

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PLANS for renovations outside the Coop and at the end of Cavendish Road

Your Romsey Councillors have worked hard to develop a plan for improving the site at the end of Cavendish Road and outside the Coop.  The agreement comes after a number...

February 2017

For three years now Romsey Labour Councillors have been working to get the Romsey Lakes open to the public.  We have held a number of public meetings and worked closely with council officers and Anderson to recognise what the public want and achieve this in a safe and efficient way.

The planning application which recognises our wishes will soon be in the public domain and this includes an application to provide 450 homes 40% of which will be affordable.  

The next phase of the public consultation is happening at the Holiday Inn, Coldhams Business Park , CB1 3LH between 1600 to 2000 on Thursday 24th February and 1000 to 1600 on Saturday 25th February 

http://www.coldhamslane.co.uk/

http://www.andersongroup.co.uk/case-studies/underwater-and-overlooked/

 

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December 2016

There has been a great deal happening with Labour's plans for the lakes.  A series of meetings with Andersons have been taking place over the past three months and we hope to announce something extremely positive in late January early February.

Unfortunately the content of the meetings is confidential and we are at a delicate stage, but I am very confident that people will be extremely positive about the announcement when it comes.

What I can say is that we have followed the steer given by the public meetings that have taken place.

 

30-6-16


A meeting is arranged with Anderson for the 11th July
Watch this space

 

18-6-16

The local and PCC elections and now the European Referendum have meant that I have had to focus elsewhere but this does not mean I have let this matter drop.  I am in regular touch with officers to try to get communications working properly with Anderson but they do not seem to be responding effectively.  The ball is very much in Anderson's court as we are ready to proceed to a plan to open the Lakes for visitors.

2-3-16

Met again with officers and we are still having difficulty obtaining the ecology report from Anderson.  I have reached out to the owner and communications have been re-established.

Plans are still moving forward from our perspective.

Our Health and Safety report has raised some issues that are not significant but will need to be addressed.


Officers are working hard and we have a plan, but first we need the ecology report from Anderson.

We have a meeting scheduled for next month.

 

2-2-16

I had a meeting today with council officers.  

  • Anderson appear to have stalled on their promise to release the ecology report
  • Meeting with Peterhouse is arranged for later in the month
  • A full Health and Safety inspection is now under way to build on the preliminary all clear that we received from the insurance company
  • Conversations are taking place about controlling anti-social behaviour
  • Communications plan will be in place by the end of the month

I have asked for a further meeting with officers before the end of the month to update me

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Follow this link to read about the history of the cement works whose workers dug the hole that is now full of water and which we call The Lakes 

UPDATE 19-11-15  Next Steps Committee

A successful and well attended meeting last evening at Mill Road Depot.

There were updates from

  • City Council
  • Andersons

There was also wide ranging discussions on a number of topics. In particular there was a concern over rumours that were being circulated about further uses for the lakes.  It was agreed that all members of the committee would provide the same message.

The lakes will be opened for walking only - there is no other agenda

 

The actions that are required as a consequence on the discussions from last night’s meeting.

  • The City Council, Anderson and Peterhouse are to meet  and encourage Peterhouse to support the aspirations to open the lakes for walking in the short term and for the longer term entering into an agreement on how the collective ownership manage the site to the approved Masterplan.  Alistair Wilson/ Craig Rought and Rob Linney
  • The Risk Assessments completed by City Council Officers and Zurich Municipal will be shared with Anderson.  
  • A long term and a short term plan may be needed and supported by a Communication Plan, to manage local expectations.  
  • The City Council will discuss and agree a policy on dogs using the site, and with the help of the Enforcement Team consider the use of Dog Control Orders. 
  • There will a follow up meeting with the East Cambridge Urban Park group when the ecological reports are available.
  • Meet with the Angling Club to discuss ecological improvements they wish to make.  
  • The City Council will make arrangements for a further series of Open Days for Spring 2016. 

 

 

 

UPDATE 4-11-15

NEXT STEPS MEETING

I held a successful meeting with Carina O'Reilly and council officers yesterday to report on the displays and consultations that have taken place at East and South Area Committees and the 4 tours public tours.

It has been agreed that the time is approaching for council officers to start negotiations with Anderson's and to this end the forecast 'Next Steps' committee on the 18-11-15 will now take place.

This is how I see the future

  • Next Steps meeting 18-11-15 will bring people up-to-date
  • Anderson and the City Council will discuss terms and the Master Plan
  • Anderson will apply for planning permission
  • City Council will consider the planning application

 

 

3-10-15 Two more visits to the lakes - this time in the sun

 

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29-9-15 More residents viewed the lakes today - more trips at the weekendIMG_0701.jpeg

 

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24-9-15  Residents viewed the lakes today - more trips next week

:) 

There were questions about current ownership and these are answered below

 

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AN INVITE TO SEE THE LAKES - LIMITED OFFER

 

 

 

 

Proposed East Cambridge Country Park

Public guided tour

 

The City Council would like to invite interested members of the public to attend a guided walk around the former Cement Pits at Coldham’s Lane, to hear about proposals to allow public access for quiet recreation around this attractive and wildlife rich site.

 

Thursday 24th September      14.30—16.00

Tuesday 29th September       12.30—14.00

Saturday 3rd October            10.30—12.00

 

Please register your interest to attend one of the above tours at: parks@cambridge.gov.uk or call

01223 458520 during office hours

 

 

 A year ago to have thought we would be this far down the line was difficult.

But the potential opening of the lakes is now becoming a reality 

 

 

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(25-7-15)

We are mindful of the potential difficulties in just opening the lakes so we are going to open them for one or two days as a trial for people to see the potential.  

When the dates are agreed people will be asked to apply on a first come first served basis and visitors will be organised in groups to be taken around the lakes

 

(8-7-15)

This afternoon the 'Next Steps' group met at Mill Rd Depot to consider an open day date for the lakes.

We also considered an agenda for getting the lakes open to the public for walking.

Although progress seems slow be assured we are moving forward.

:)

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(23-6-15)

We took the Lake's Committee around the lakes last night.

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Zoe Moghadas, Colin Wiles and Baroness Worthington visiting the lakes

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Sue Wells (Chair of Friends of Cherry Hinton Brook) and Dave Baigent (Chair of the Labour led council group working to open the lakes to the public)

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In two weeks time the 'next steps' group will be meeting to consider how to open the lakes.

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(8-6-15)

Met with officers today as Chair of the East Area Urban Park Committee and suggested:

  • We immediately carry out a health and safety inspection
  • We offer an opportunity for those who attended the public meetings to walk around the lakes
  • We ask Anderson's for an interim ecological report
  • We set a date for a meeting of the 'next steps' group 

(7-6-15)

Now that the General Election is out of the way I am meeting with officers tomorrow to discuss the next steps we shall be taking, and to find out how much the delay in the City Plan will influence the opening.

Wait for the update.

 

(21-5-1)

 

I have to say that nothing would have happened if it hadn't been for the local campaign group led by Steve Turval and his colleagues.  They campaigned locally for over three years and it was one of their group who persuaded me to take up the campaign if I got elected as City Councillor.

I pledged to help, and during my first year on the council I have established a public committee to bring people together.  This committee has council support and now it only a matter of waiting for the result of the local plan before we can put proposals out for a proper public debate. Then it is a matter for Cambridge City Council to make the final decision and hopefully we shall open the lakes for walking.

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Anderson's invite to public consultation 27-2-15 

Dave Baigent attended the consultation meeting at the David Lloyd Centre and spent over two hours having lively debates with some of the 350 people who attended.
It is important to note that nothing is set in stone but that following Dave getting the interested parties together at two meetings at the Guildhall there has been a considerable activity.
This consultation is the next step towards a potential opening of one lake for walkers.  There are a lot of hurdles to cross, including keeping safety at the top of the agenda. People are invited to respond to Anderson's Questionnaire as part of this next phase of consultation.  

The website is available at www.lakesrecreation.co.uk and comments can be made here or to enquiries@lakesrecreation.co.uk

 

 

cambridge_lakes_Masterplan_board_(1).jpg

17-2-15

People will have been monitoring the meetings Chaired by Dave Baigent at the Guildhall on the lakes.  It now seems likely that walking access will become available this year subject to health and safety approval and agreement about how to protect the ecology of the site.

This of course is part of a wider scheme to develop the land at the back of the lakes adjacent to Coldhams Lane.  To ensure people are up to date the Anderson Group will be providing a public consultation event for their draft plans for the whole site as follows

-       Saturday 28th Feb @ David Lloyd, 11am to 4pm.

-       Monday 2nd March @ Queen Emma Primary School, 5.30pm to 8.30pm.

 

for further details go to http://romsey.cambridgelabour.org.uk/l

 

Dave Baigent City Councillor for Romsey

29th January at the Guildhall.

Cllr Dave Baigent chaired a second public meeting to discuss the future of the lakes. Committee room one was filled to capacity by representatives of over 30 groups and individuals.

Dave was able to inform the meeting that there had been a considerable progress since the first meeting and that it was now possible to see a light on the horizon in the move to get the lakes open to 'walkers'.  

Patsy Dell head of planning at Cambridge City Council advised the meeting that the draft city plan laid out a vision for the future, and that her and Dave were meeting regularly with interested groups on the council and outside to make this proposal a reality.

Cam Lakes reported on how their survey had almost 1000 responses and that the vast majority of these were positive.  Fiona gave a detailed explanation of some of the trends shown in the survey and Dave thanked her and the rest of her team for carrying out this important work.

The Managing Director of the Anderson Group Andrew Jay explained that he was in favour of opening the first lake.  Discussions were already in hand with insurers and Andrew also spoke about how advice was being sought on what a management group would look like.  Anderson's will be holding a public consultation late in February at which they will be providing their initial thoughts for the whole site.

Patsy, Andrew, Fiona and Dave responded to a wide range of questions in what proved to be an friendly, informed and lively debate.

Towards the end of the meeting Dave asked for volunteers for a smaller project group to look in more detail at the proposal.  

In summing up the meeting Dave said "The prize is clear: the opening of the first lake to walkers, early consideration to disabled access, the protection of the ecology and foremost in the minds of all would be the safety of those using the site."

Before closing the meeting Dave thanked Patsy, Andrew Fiona and the wider meeting for their support.

Addendum  CEN are running a story about Romsey Beach, this is not on the agenda.  Current thinking is to get a lake open for walking in the first instance.  Talk of beaches, donkey rides and public water access are misplaced at this time.

 

 

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Cllr. Dave Baigent in the chair, with Patsy Dell

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Cambridge Lakes

February 2017 For three years now Romsey Labour Councillors have been working to get the Romsey Lakes open to the public.  We have held a number of public meetings and...

NEWS RELEASE

 

30 January, 2017

 

 

COUNCIL WELCOMES NEW DATA SHOWING CAMBRIDGE’S CONTINUED STRENGTHS, BUT MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND LIVING WAGE NEEDED TO END ‘TALE OF TWO CITIES’

CAMBRIDGE City Council has welcomed the annual UK cities comparison report published today by the Centre for Cities think tank, which shows that Cambridge continues to shine among UK cities in terms of skills, innovation and economic growth. 

 

But the council also says that the latest data on housing affordability and local income inequality shows that the February Government Housing White Paper needs to do far more to help the council and its partners provide Cambridge housing that is affordable and meets the needs of people who earn average incomes but still cannot afford to live in the area.

 

Using new data, the report also suggests Cambridge is the most “unequal” UK city in terms of income distribution, emphasising the importance of the council’s Living Wage campaign and the need for local businesses and organisations to work with the council to ensure fair pay, so local people can afford rising housing costs and prosperity is shared more fairly.

 

The Centre for Cities’ new report, ‘Cities Outlook 2017’ is the latest of their series of annual reports that provide hard evidence of how cities are performing across a range of key facts.  Once again, Cambridge has come out as one of the UK’s leading cities for skills, innovation and economic growth.

  • Cambridge is confirmed as the most innovative city in the UK, with 341 patent applications per 100,000 of population. The Cambridge Phenomenon is thriving.
  • Cambridge remains the UK city with the most highly qualified workforce too, with 66.5% of the population having high level qualifications.
  • Unemployment overall is second best in the country at 0.7%.
  • Cambridge also has one of the fastest growing populations, up 1.9% from last year’s figures to 130,900 due to the high rate of new housing locally.
  • However, house prices are still third highest in the country, with the average cost of Cambridge house prices quoted at £475,820.  Crucially, despite real wages having gone up 3.2% in the last year, and record levels of local house building, housing affordability remains third worst among UK cities.
  • For the first time, this year’s report also indicates how reliant each city is on trade with the European Union.  50% of Cambridge’s exports currently go to the EU, which shows the importance of that market.

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “We welcome this latest report and the fresh evidence it provides, including on how well Cambridge is performing compared to other cities.  It is great to know that Cambridge people remain the most highly skilled, and Cambridge businesses are the most innovative in the UK.

 

“However, housing affordability remains at crisis levels. The extra £70m we have secured from Government for new council housing through the devolution deal will help us provide over 500 Cambridge families with new council homes in the next five years.  And the £100m for affordable housing across the whole devolution area will benefit people who want to live and work in Cambridge including a high proportion of extra Housing Association housing in neighbouring South Cambridgeshire.  

“We need to continue to add more affordable housing, both for rent and purchase if we are to fully address affordability issues as our economy and population grows.

“We will also continue our campaign to secure a real Living Wage for all Cambridge workers, and work with employers to address income inequality.  Housing is a major cause of the cost of living in the city, and we urge all employers to recognise that and pay the Living Wage.  All local employers have a role to end what is a modern day ‘Tale of Two Cities’, playing their part in addressing the inequality that exists in our great city.”

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors

  1. You can read the full report on the Centre For Cities website here:http://www.centreforcities.org/publication/cities-outlook-2017/

 

  1. Contacts 

    Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email: lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email: tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email: castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email:antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk,

tel: 01223 457001

Cambridge reported as still being a Tale of Two Cities

NEWS RELEASE   30 January, 2017     COUNCIL WELCOMES NEW DATA SHOWING CAMBRIDGE’S CONTINUED STRENGTHS, BUT MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND LIVING WAGE NEEDED TO END ‘TALE OF TWO CITIES’...

Cambridge Street Aid – Helping People On The Street To Turn A Corner


There are lots of reasons why people beg on the street. Each person has their own story to tell, and mostly it'll be one we can sympathise with.

Many of us instinctively want to give money to people we think need our help, and it feels more personal when you give to someone directly.  But have you ever wondered whether you are really helping? 

csa-poster-orange-A2-v5-hires.jpgIn the view of leading charities the evidence is clear. At best your act of kindness will do no harm. At worst, and all too often, your money will get spent on drink or drugs and may help to perpetuate a miserable life which often only ends in premature death. 

It may also surprise you to know that the link between begging and having nowhere to live is not always strong.  Of course there are genuinely homeless people on the street, most of whom have very complex needs.  But many rough sleepers refuse to beg while many of the people begging have somewhere to stay.  Some even have their own tenancy.  No one needs to beg to get into a hostel: Cambridge homelessness hostels are free to enter and eligible people can claim housing benefit to meet the cost.

‎What you do with your own money is your business.  But if you don’t want to gamble on whether you may be doing more harm than good, a clear choice is to donate to Cambridge Street Aid.

Cambridge Street Aid is a fund where every penny you donate will go directly into helping to end the waste and misery of a life spent on the streets.  You can also be sure that your money will add to, not substitute for, the help provided by statutory and charitable organisations described on these pages.  Support workers, homelessness charities and other community groups can bid into the fund for things that will make a real difference to people’s lives; the only limitation being that it must help a person get off, or stay off, the streets.

So, now you don’t have to gamble when you give what will your choice be:  Loose change or REAL change?    

Cambridge Street Aid is administered by the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation.  To find out more, or to make a donation, please visit the Cambridge Street Aid page.

Cambridge Street Aid

Cambridge Street Aid – Helping People On The Street To Turn A Corner There are lots of reasons why people beg on the street. Each person has their own story...

28-10-16

Planning Inspectorate Appeal Decision

 

 Appeal Decision 

Hearing held on 23 August 2016 

Site visit made on 23 August 2016 

by Roy Merrett BSc(Hons) DipTP MRTPI 

an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government 

Decision date: 27 October 2016 

 

 Appeal Ref: APP/Q0505/W/16/3145912 

Land to the rear of 27 - 37 Romsey Terrace, Cambridge CB1 3NH 

 

 The appeal is made under section 78 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 against a failure to give notice within the prescribed period of a decision on an application for planning permission. 

 

 

 The appeal is made by Robinson College against Cambridge City Council. 

 

 

 The application Ref 15/2355/FUL, is dated 1 August 2014. 

 The development proposed is four dwellings – two semi-detached three bedroom dwellings and two semi-detached two bedroom dwellings and associated amenity space and facilitating development. 

 

 

 Decision 

1. The appeal is dismissed.

 

30-04-16

Romsey Labour shared residents’ disbelief this week on hearing that the central government inspectors are ignoring local requests for a hearing in Cambridge.

Having already seen the developers decide to exploit a loophole in order to take matters out of local hands (http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Decision-Robinson-College-8216-garden-grab-8217/story-29159898-detail/story.html), we had hoped that at least the government inspectors would come to Cambridge to hear submissions from residents, councillors and officers. This was especially the case since East Area Committee (made up of all councillors from Romsey, Abbey, Petersfield and Coleridge) fully supported residents’ request for the inspectors to come to Cambridge, and officers made this known to the inspectors. We are therefore disappointed that there is currently a danger that the case will be decided by written submissions only.

Sophie Barnett, Romsey Labour’s City Council candidate for May 2016, has taken a keen interest in this issue, and is fully supportive of residents’ concerns. She says, “Just like when the external inspector overturned the Council’s decision on the McClaren’s development, this is another example of a planning decision being made by a centrally-appointed inspector rather than democratically-elected councillors. Local residents, in Romsey Terrace and across the City, have many concerns about this development and should be given the chance to present these to the inspector, especially since they have been denied the chance to have their views heard at a Development Control Forum.”

Romsey Labour councillors are working with residents to persuade the inspectorate to change their mind. We will keep you informed on this page.

9-3-16

The Development Control Forum planned for today has been cancelled by Robinson College and they have gone straight to appeal.


In doing this they have first stopped the negotiations taking place with Cambridge City Council Planners.

Second, they have cancelled discussions aimed to find a joint solution by the Development Control Forum which was to take place between them and the residents association in Romsey Terrace.

Third, I hope this is not how the elected representatives on the City Council and the Officers are going to treated in the future? 

1-3-16

This proposal by Robinson College continues with another plan due to go to the Development Control Forum on 9-3-16.  Local councillors are supporting the residents association in this.

15-1-16

We have again met with the residents association and advised them on how they may continue to challenge the development.

20-3-15

"Well I suppose we never really thought this planning application would reflect the view of residents - but we are disappointed that it ignored our views completely"

A quote from a local resident about the 'new' plans by Robinson College for Romsey Terrace sums it all up.  Robinson College's latest PR exercise was hardly glitzy but it was a charm offensive with four very pleasant people helping visitors to 'understand'.

The new plans though were little different to the earlier plans that were withdrawn and represent a gross overdevelopment.  The best thing really is for Robinson College to sit down with residents and try to talk this through.

 

30-9-14

Cllr. Dave Baigent signed the petition against this development on Saturday.

 

15-8-14

Plans have now been submitted for the proposed development of five dwellings - two semi-detached three-bedroom dwellings and three terraces two-bedroom dwellings and associated amenity space and facilitating development.

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It is likely that this application will be amongst the first to go to the new centralised planning arrangements that were a feature of Labours May 2014 Manifesto.  

I WILL, as promised, be asking for this development to be rejected.

 

More details can be found by going to the council's planning pages at https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications// and entering Romsey Terrace

 

31-7-14

For a moment it appeared that Robinson College's plans to develop accommodation the car park in Romsey Terrace were on hold, but now the issue has come alive again after residents discovered that agents were resubmitting plans and trying to limit the amount of time for objections. 

A meeting was quickly called by residents and Dave attended along with 10 other local people.

Serious concerns were raised at the meeting about some of the communications between council officers and the agents and these can be found at https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=N33RA8DX3E000 .  There is a lot of documentation here, but people who are involved in objecting may find it beneficial to take the time to read through all of them.

Dave was able to suggest that the campaigners should

  1. try to step up their public campaign,  
  2. ask to meet with the Master and Fellows of Robinson College
  3. take their concerns to East Area Committee.

Roy Stamp is coordinating the action plan and your labour councillors remain ready to help.

 

IMG_3365.jpg Two of the three residents I met with (23-4-14) 

Round One to the residents of Romsey Terrace  (9-5-14)

There were over 20 objections, by letter, by email or online to the planning application by Robinson College for Romsey Terrace.  They came from concerned residents, mainly in Romsey Terrace and Coleridge Road.

Clearly, residents have made an impact and achieved a great result as the planning officer is going to recommend refusal of this application, which is a great result.

  

25-4-15

Dave was appalled at the lack of consideration shown by Robinson College for you and the impact on your lives by their proposal.  On the other hand it was impressive to see the way your community acted together, to register complaints and attend the meeting on the 24-4-14 to make your voices heard.

I will continue to keep watch on developments in case there is an appeal, or if other applications are made on this site. If this happens, I will meet with residents again to get your opinions.

I must add that it was impressive to see the way your community acted together to make your voices heard by attending the meeting on the 24-4-14 and registering objections.  I was equally appalled at the lack of consideration shown by Robinson College for you and the impact on your lives by their proposal.  

If I get elected on May 22nd I will continue to stand alongside you in your campaign and under Labour's proposed arrangements for planning I all be able to represent your views.

My campaigns against inappropriate and over-development on Cromwell and Mill Road are both very visible examples of what I am capable of achieving. I am a doer, which is something I've learned from a lifetime of public service.

Politics needs some new faces and I hope you can recognise my sincerity in wanting to be one of those.  If elected I will continue to listen and to represent the voice of Romsey because only by doing that will I fulfil my pledge, which is to work hard to make the ‘town’ where I live a better place.

  Dave

28-4-14

Dave was invited to an open meeting on Monday (28-4-14) at the Deaf Centre in Romsey Terrace by residents concerned about plans by Robinson College to build 10 flats on a car park and a grassed area.

"I am so glad that I went because there were 40 plus people there who all were very concerned about their loss of car parking space and the extra housing in a road already full." 

This looks like another one of those land grabbing projects that will make money for the owners and fill in another small open space.  How long will it be before the council actually wake up to the fact that these sort of planning applications are not just for 2014 but taking away important spaces in Romsey for ever with all the loss that means for us and our environment? 

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The owner of the land is actually Robinson College and they are just acting like speculators - where is their moral compass?

Why is it that Robinson College thinks its OK to take away a car park and a green space to put in more accommodation?  I don't think it is to house their students. I am told that the college want to get planning permission and then sell the land.  If this is right then its about profit and the market is not taking care of residents needs but putting money in developers and Robinson College's pockets.

The LibDem manifesto talks about 'ensuring the city retains its compact character surrounded by green belt' but at what stage will they call a halt?  When will enough be enough? 

I share the residents concerns and will support them. 

 

 

Inspector turns down Robinson College's plans for Romsey Terrace

28-10-16 Planning Inspectorate Appeal Decision    Appeal Decision  Hearing held on 23 August 2016  Site visit made on 23 August 2016  by Roy Merrett BSc(Hons) DipTP MRTPI  an Inspector appointed... Read more

TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON RIVER MOORINGS

A TWELVE-WEEK consultation on proposals to change the way Cambridge City Council manages moorings alongside its land by the River Cam gets under way on 27 October.

The consultation invites views on a number of elements of the council’s approach to moorings. 

As well as being a treasured feature of the city, the Cam has become one of the busiest inland waterways in the UK and is a popular destination for a wide range of recreational activities. 

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The council has already listened to the views of a number of river boat dwellers through public questions at committee and at full council meetings.

It wishes to apologise to those people who felt the first draft of the consultation document, considered at committee, was not sufficiently clear, and who thought it gave an inaccurate picture of those living on the river. 

The council fully recognises the community of people living on the river and their contribution to Cambridge society, and wishes to engage positively with them, and with other river users, in setting future moorings policy.

The consultation document seeks to make very clear the council’s intention to support those people who live on the river, not only during the consultation but through its services delivered day to day. 

The consultation asks river users, residents and others to give views on a series of proposals including:

Basing mooring licence fees on boat length

The council currently charges a licence fee irrespective of boat length. Previous consultations have shown boaters with smaller vessels believe this to be unfair and research shows that in other parts of the country there are different fees according to boat length.

Responding to safety concerns by stopping mooring at the Riverside wall

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A number of options have been reviewed in the past but no feasible solution has been found to provide cost-effective, safe access to and from moored boats and the adjoining river wall on this part of the river. Residents have rightly expressed concern, and the consultation seeks to consider how the council could mitigate the impact on those currently using the area. Any boat we have regulated to moor at Riverside wall which has people living aboard will be offered alternative moorings on the Cam and will not lost their home.

Reviewing the fees charged for mooring on council land

The council has previously committed to reviewing fees and charges to ensure that they are fair. Charges should not only cover the costs of operating the mooring service, but make a contribution to the services provided by the council to the wider Cambridge community.

 

The location, type and number of mooring berths, provision for visitor moorings and penalties for those who overstay, a revised enforcement policy and ways of managing mooring waiting lists are among other topics covered in the consultation.

Cllr Richard Robertson, Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources, said: “This is an open consultation and no outcomes have been assumed or decisions made. Every comment we receive will be carefully considered and used to inform and shape the final policy, which will be presented to councillors.

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“We are absolutely committed to listening to people’s views and to working closely with all those directly affected by these proposals. 

“It’s really important that we have a clear and transparent approach to moorings because the Cam is a very busy waterway and an important part of our city environment.

“This consultation is about being open and fair to boaters, residents and other river users.”

A report is set to be presented to Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee on 23 March informing councillors about the outcomes of the consultation and the council’s revised River Cam moorings policy.

The consultation will run until 20 January and details will be published on the council’s website at www.cambridge.gov.uk. Printed details are available by calling Tracy Okten on 01223 457478.

The consultation began on 27 October and will ask river users, residents and others to put forward their views on a number of proposals including:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation on Moorings Management Policy

TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON RIVER MOORINGS A TWELVE-WEEK consultation on proposals to change the way Cambridge City Council manages moorings alongside its land by the River Cam gets...

The Chairman of the Greater Cambridge City Deal Board has today underlined his commitment to listening to the public response on peak-time congestion control points.

Work is currently underway to assess the public response to an eight-point plan to tackle congestion in the city, including the concept of six virtual road closures on key routes to manage traffic.

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Cllr Herbert, leader of Cambridge City Council said: “Along with other Board members, I am immensely grateful to all the respondents who have provided a wealth of insight and information about how we can best tackle traffic congestion in Cambridge, and have responded in detail on the consultation that closed ten days ago.
"From what I have read and heard so far in responses to the consultation one aspect, the proposal for the six Control Points, has serious problems given the evidence on the scale of its negative impacts on city businesses and residents, a

nd at this stage I am unconvinced that it is viable.

"I know that other Board members have also been considering these issues and share the view that that the proposed scheme for six Peak-time Congestion Control Points (PCCPs) needs full review.

"This will be part of the next stage once the City Deal has completed the assessment of all the 9000 returned surveys and over 1000 more detailed responses and prepared an initial report for the Board and Assembly, learning from the consultation responses.


"The officer team will then consider all the evidence, evaluate and work up further proposals for demand management to address growing peak-time central city congestion.

"Only by removing avoidable peak vehicle journeys can we restore bus reliability, cut massive journey delays for travellers, and end the wider damage to the quality of life of both residents and travellers and the risk to city's current and future prosperity.

"It is heartening that there is clear and strong community support for this and tackling congestion and a recognition that a far higher percentage of journeys need to be non-car. And the eventual solutions need to be acceptable to the wider community, while recognising that no solution is going to be universally popular.

"Once work on the updated proposals and any additional options has been completed, I am also committed to ensuring that the City Deal again seeks the views of residents, commuters (including bus passengers), businesses, stakeholders and the City Deal Assembly before any final decisions."

 

 

 

 

CONTINUING DISCUSSION on PEAK-TIME CONGESTION CONTROL POINTS (PCCP) and RESIDENT PARKING ZONES.

10-10-16

This weekend Romsey Labour Party took to the street to promote the consultation on Peak-time Congestion Points.  We knocked on 1100 doors and it was clear that the mood had changed.  Many of our residents were now more concerned that they were going to be disadvantaged by PCCP's.  This is inline with soundings taken on Mill Road over the past week and a concern over pollution and congestion has given way to a fear of disruption of every day lives.  We are in listening mode as the letter from Lewis Herbert indicates.

7-10-16

This is the latest comment from Lewis Herbert Labour Chair of the Greater Cambridge City Deal:

“We get the message from Cambridge residents, local companies, and from others responding to the consultation, that there are issues with the control point proposals in their current form.

We are running the consultation to test ideas and listen to responses because congestion can only be tackled in partnership with the whole community in Cambridge and beyond.

We will undertake a full review of the control points and consider all other responses on the eight point congestion package consultation after it closes on the 10th October.

The City Deal will analyse responses and then publish an interim response ahead of further work on developing the best package to sort out the city's growing congestion problems. As we have said, doing nothing is not an option."

To be heard fill in the questionnaire or complete online https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/5GK2S/

Remember your comments can include the location of PCCP’s, the times they should operate, if they should be one way or two way and indeed if people think they are a good idea at all.  Don’t forget positive comments are also important.

Cllr Dave Baigent dave.baigent@fitting-in.com  (07802 495 329)

Cllr Anna Smith anna.smith@cambridge.gov.uk (07855 182232)

Cllr Zoe Moghadas zoemoghadas@hotmail.co.uk (07813 700986)

Cllr Sophie Barnett sophie.barnett@cambridge.gov.uk  (07957 188 850)

 

 

6-10-16

There was a march yesterday organised by the Mill Road Traders against the Peak-time Congestion Controls.

I attended and spoke to many of the 100 or so people who turned out on a cold autumnal morning at 0800.  When the march ended at Parker's Piece I spoke to the whole crowd to congratulate them for taking part in this democratic exercise and to encourage them to complete the survey before Monday.  

I also cautioned against many of the untrue stories that are being spread about the PCCP's. As an Assembly Member on the Greater Cambridge City Deal I am looking forward to reading people's suggestions for PCCP's, especially about their location, the times they should operate, if they should be one way or two way and indeed if people think they are a good idea at all.

I cannot emphasise enough that this is not a done deal.  No decisions have been made and any decision will very much bear in mind the outcome of the survey.

I appreciate Anthony Carpen providing an opportunity for me to get my message out after the march https://youtu.be/-lbqXmyelgY 

 

2-10-16

We were outside the Coop on Mill Road on Saturday 1st October discussing the proposals with residents and leading to a thought that: "If resident parking were to be adopted for Coleridge, Petersfield and Romsey, then a single PCP at the swimming pool would stop through traffic travelling into the city on Mill Road at peak-times - provide a safer Mill Road for walking and cycling, and considerably reduce pollution."

Synopsis.

It appears from our discussions so far that the vast majority of Romsey residents are in favour of closing Mill Road to through traffic during peak congestion times in the morning - some residents believe that closing Mill Road to through traffic all the time would be a good idea and there are also a few residents who feel that any closure will cause them a considerable harm.

Amongst those who believe PCCP is a good idea, the debate varies to where closure should be.  The main suggestions are at the swimming pool, at the end of Mill Road just after Seymour Street or at the junction of Coleridge Road.  There is general agreement that in the morning these points should be tidal to allow traffic to freely exit the city and that the early trial should be between 0730 and 0915.  If this works and people leave their cars outside the city, there should then be no need for the PCCP's to operate in the afternoon - it may therefore be unnecessary at the start of the trial to use the afternoon session.  

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Although it is likely that a single point at the swimming pool will cause the least disruption to Romsey residents, given that most of Petersfield is resident parking only, this would make Romsey into the last place to park before the city.  The outcome would then be that commuters would drive around Romsey until they found a place to park and then walk/cycle into the city.  

To reduce this problem would require a tidal flow PCCP that let traffic out of Romsey but stopped it coming in at either end of Mill Road and at Coleridge Rd.  However, it is likely that commuters would soon learn that they could get to Romsey via a range of roads in Petersfield and from Coldhams Lane.  Therefore a number of road closures would be required to stop this from happening and this will cause a significant disruption to residents.  

For residents of Coleridge a similar position would apply as commuters looked for parking spaces on their streets.  Now that boundary changes have been approved for the county a large part of Coleridge will soon be the responsibility of the County Councillor for Romsey.

One way around the problem of commuter parking in Romsey and Coleridge would be to make the whole of Romsey, Coleridge and Petersfield resident parking only.  The County Council are responsible for resident parking and a joint city and county working party is currently looking at this (I am part of that committee).

If resident parking were to be adopted for Coleridge, Petersfield and Romsey, then a single PCP at the swimming pool would stop through traffic into the city on Mill Road at peak-times - provide a safer Mill Road for walking and cycling, and considerably reduce pollution. 

Dave Baigent

 

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Saturday 17th September 2016 1000 -1230 Sainsbury's Coldhams Lane.

Bring your queries and thoughts about the PCCP's in Romsey or have your say online

https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/5GK2S/

You may also wish to discuss resident parking - there are currently discussions taking place about this and a recommendation is going to be made to Joint Area Committee in October.

ONE of the visitors to an earlier discussion session used the term a 'virtuous circle' in referring to the net positives of reducing traffic in Romsey - less pollution, safer cycling and walking = fitter population. 

Some residents are concerned that they will be trapped in their homes by the congestion control points - if you have this concern or similar contact me dave.baigent@fitting-in.com 

It is important to understand that the congestion points will only be in operation for a short time in the morning, with the potential for a repeat for a short time in the evening (if necessary).  

There are a number of suggestions coming forward for the location of the PCCP's.  One is to move it to the end of Mill Road, another is that it should be at the junction with Coleridge.  Either of these would reduce the amount of cars that will drive around Romsey, and then park up and walk into town.  However, they are also likely to inconvenience some residents

There have also been suggestions that the Coldhams Lane PCCP should be moved further down to say Vinery Road to again stop people driving around Romsey looking for somewhere to park.

The anticipation is that the PCCP on Mill Road will be tidal - that is to say stopping traffic coming into Cambridge.  Residents will be able to leave Romsey at all times via Mill Road.

Discussion on reducing peak time traffic congestion in Cambridge at Ross Street Community Centre Sunday 24th July 1300 - 1700

At a well attended meeting residents were able to ask questions and make their thoughts known to Romsey Councillors.

  • The overwhelming consensus was that PCCP were a good idea.
  • The majority of people thought that the PCCP on Mill Rd would be better placed on Mill Rd just after the junction with Coleridge.  
  • Consensus was that the Mill Road Rd PCCP should be tidal to allow people to leave Romsey via Mill Rd.
  • Majority in favour of further consideration of blue badge usage

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During Peak times traffic congestion and pollution are seriously affecting Cambridge residents.  The City Deal provides money to help with this and a survey is under way to consider two proposals to reduce the amount of vehicles travelling into and across the city and promote walking, cycling and buses as an alternative by  the use of  Peak Time Congestion Control Points (PCCP) and a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL).

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Probably two of the PTCP are going to provide the greatest advantage for Romsey residents.  Situated on Mill Road and Coldhams Lane, they will stop most inbound traffic, reduce pollution, and free up these roads for cyclists and buses. 

Arguably, PTCP on Mill Road should only need to operate in the morning and be tidal to stop incoming city bound traffic.

There is a suggestion that rather than be on Mill Road Bridge the PCCP should be at the junction with Coleridge Rd to prevent traffic coming into a significant part of Romsey during rush hour.  It is also worth consideration as to if the Coldhams Lane PCCP should move down towards Vinery Road.

The precise location of these points is subjectof the discussion and Romsey needs to ensure that no one is trapped in their home, or subject to rat running.

Romsey Labour party has arranged a public exhibition with the opportunity to discuss these measures on Sunday 27th July between 1100 and 1500 at Ross Street Community Centre

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The City Deal WEBSITE and the link to the consultation

THERE ARE ALSO  OTHER EXHIBITIONS  

There is also an online booklet and questionnaire  

 

Parking

Another discussion that Romsey should also be part of will be the question of parking.  There is currently a revue of resident parking schemes taking place.  Potentially this will increase the amount of resident parking zones.  If these go ahead, the knock on affect of this will be that areas without parking zones will be subject to displacement parking.  Romsey should therefore be part of this debate and we should also consider if we want to prevent commuters from using Romsey as a final stopping place for their journey into the city.  This can also be discussed at the Romsey Exhibition.

 

For further details contact your local councillors 

 

The end of PEAK-TIME CONGESTION CONTROL POINTS

The Chairman of the Greater Cambridge City Deal Board has today underlined his commitment to listening to the public response on peak-time congestion control points. Work is currently underway to...

(10-10-16)

The results of the survey on Devolution are now available and will be discussed tonight at Strategy and Resources Committee and again at a specially constituted full council meeting.

 

The labour party supported the motion put to the full council held 27-6-16 on devolution and the provision of funding to provide 500 council Homes.  The LibDems did not support the motion nor the proposal to accept funding for 500 Council Homes.

See below for fuller details

 

(9-6-16) TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON DEVOLUTION DEAL

CONSULTATION starts today (8 July) on proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal that would see hundreds of new council homes built in Cambridge.

Residents, businesses, students and other people are being urged to take this opportunity to put forward their views on the proposals.

Cambridge City Council agreed to support the government’s proposals for a deal on 28 June and other councils in the proposed deal area have now also given their support. 

The consultation will run from 8 July to 23 August after which the results will be reviewed and a final decision made by the councils.

The deal would see the transfer of a range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority comprising representatives of the seven councils across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Greater Cambridge Greater Peterborough Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP).

The creation of an elected mayor is also a part of the devolution deal proposals. This mayor would chair the combined authority and all residents in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough would be able to vote to elect them.

The devolution deal would include two new funding streams that would hasten the delivery of affordable housing:

 

  1. £70million over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ which the council would spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis. The city council would use some £10million of this fund to replace any of the 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy scheme. 

  2. A further £100million affordable housing fund over five years for affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area, with a mix of tenures including affordable rented and low cost home ownership. In recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult housing market conditions, a substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area with delivery of the homes likely to be through housing associations;

 

There would also be a new £20million annual fund for the next 30 years (£600million) to support economic growth, development of local infrastructure and jobs.

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “We support the devolution deal for many reasons, but the biggest by far is the extra funding for new affordable housing for rent.

“We negotiated hard and won agreement to millions of pounds to build at least 500 new council homes in Cambridge plus hundreds of extra additional housing association rental homes for Greater Cambridge, helping councils to take big strides forward in tackling the massive local housing affordability crisis.

“It’s really important that local people, organisations and businesses take a hard look at what is being put forward and use the consultation to tell us what they think - I would urge everyone to take this opportunity to put their point of view across by the August deadline.

“All of the comments we receive back will be considered by councils in the autumn, and by the new national government team, whose clear support will also be vital before the devolution deal can be confirmed.”

The consultation with lots of supporting information that explains the proposed deal in more depth is available at www.cambridge.gov.uk/devolution.

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors:

 

  1. The deal has been negotiated with government by Cambridge City Council, Cambridgeshire County Council, Peterborough City Council, South Cambridgeshire District Council, Fenland District Council, Huntingdonshire District Council, East Cambridgeshire District Council and The Greater Cambridge Greater Peterborough Enterprise Partnership (LEP).

  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email:lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email:tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email:castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

 

 

(27-6-16) COUNCIL AGREES TO SUPPORT DEVOLUTION DEAL FOR MORE HOMES

CAMBRIDGE City Council has agreed to support the government’s proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal that would see hundreds of new council homes built in Cambridge.

 

At a special meeting of the full council (Monday 27 June) councillors agreed the deal which will also be debated by other councils in the proposed deal area.

 

If the plans are supported by the other councils there will be a consultation with residents and employers from 4 July to 22 August, in advance of any final decision being made.


The deal covers the potential transfer of a wide range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority of the seven councils, across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Local Enterprise Partnership.


The devolution deal proposes two new funding sources to boost the delivery of affordable housing in Greater Cambridge:

 

  1. A £70million fund for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, which  the council will spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis. Some £10million of this fund would be available to the city council to replace any of those 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy scheme. 

  2. A parallel second £100million affordable housing fund over five years to deliver affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area, with a mix of tenures to include affordable rented and low cost home ownership.  A substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area, in recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult housing market conditions. It is likely that delivery would be primarily through housing associations.

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “The devolution deal that we have agreed to support and share for public consultation would bring desperately needed new homes to Cambridge, helping us to ensure that people get the homes they need and deserve and to secure the future growth of the city’s economy.

 

“We have a housing affordability crisis in the city that requires strong action and we have negotiated hard with government to secure millions of pounds for investment in new homes, putting housing at the centre of the devolution deal.”

 

“It will now be for residents and businesses to have their say on the proposals in a public consultation and I would urge everyone to take this opportunity to put their point of view across.

 

“We will consider all of the comments we receive during the consultation, along with those of the new national government leaders, before deciding whether or not to confirm our initial support for the devolution plans.”

 

The deal would also see the creation of an elected mayor to chair the combined authority who would have specific powers, particularly over transport.

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors:

 

 

  1. 1.     ‘Cambridge Housing Fund’ within the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Devolution Plan Subject to agreement on the devolution deal. Detail below agreed between Cambridge City Council and the government, also working with the seven council Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution team:

 

  • £70m grant to be made available to Cambridge City Council, for it to use to build new council housing. 

  • At least £60m of the grant to deliver the 500 new council homes in Cambridge by the city council will spend the grant over a five year period on social rented homes(defined as rents at Local Housing Allowance levels). 

  • £10m of the grant will be available to the city council to replace any of the 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy. 

  • The city council will combine the funding with Right to Buy receipts in its control. 

 

  • The city council has already identified potential sites and will develop a detailed delivery plan.

  • The new housing will be owned and managed through the council’s Housing Revenue Account (HRA) and will be let as secure local authority tenancies.

  • Delivery of the new homes will be undertaken in close liaison with South Cambridgeshire District Council in relation to their complementary affordable housing programme and through the Greater Cambridge Housing Development Agency, the shared housing delivery vehicle operated by the two Councils.
     
  • The city council will have the freedom to choose the extent that it provides the new homes on land that it owns or land owned by others (including through section 106 planning agreements).

  • The grant will be made available to the city council through the new Combined Authority. 

  • The grant is separate and in addition to a £100m affordable housing grant in the Devolution Agreement for non-council Cambridgeshire and Peterborough housing for affordable rent and shared ownership housing to be provided via housing associations, including a particular focus on delivering this in South Cambridgeshire and Greater Cambridge.

  • Issues relating to government plans for ‘higher value sales’, affecting Cambridge council housing, were not addressed in the devolution discussions and will be the subject of further discussion between the Government and councils, including with Cambridge City Council.



  1. Reports presented to council committees are available on the council’s website:http://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/ieDocHome.aspx;

  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email:lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email:tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email:castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

 

Cambridge News three articles one and two and three

The Devolution Document from Government to be considered in public by Full Council 27th June 1800 Guild Hall.

 

The Press Release  17 June, 2016

CAMBRIDGE City Council will consider the government’s proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal at a special meeting of the full council on Monday 27 June at 6pm.     lewisherbert.jpg

Along with a Peterborough City Council meeting that evening, these will be the first of seven council meetings to decide on devolution and a new mayor.

If the plans are supported by the councils, there would be a July to September consultation with residents and employers across the city before any final decision is made on the deal.

The proposed deal covers the potential transfer of a wide range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority of the seven councils, across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Local Enterprise Partnership.

It also proposes the creation of an elected mayor to chair the combined authority who would have specific powers, particularly over transport.

The devolution deal proposes two new funding sources to boost the delivery of affordable housing in Greater Cambridge:

More follows

  • £70million fund for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, which  the council will spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis.
    (see bullet point summary also attached)
  • A parallel second £100m affordable housing fund over five years to deliver affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area with a mix of tenures to include affordable rented and low cost home ownership.  A substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area, in recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult  housing market conditions. It is likely that delivery would be primarily through housing associations.

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “It was vital for us that the discussion on a devolution deal was on this more local geography to give Cambridge a say and its challenges priority, and we welcome the fact that the strength of our case has been recognised in the revised proposals. 

“Alongside proposinging genuine devolution opportunities based on the Greater Cambridge/ Greater Peterborough area, the focus of our work, and at the centre of the Council’s decision a week Monday, will be the city’s housing affordability crisis and the need for new council housing in Cambridge recognised in a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’, and in the second, wider affordable housing investment plan for in housing association projects in Greater Cambridge and across the county.”

Commenting on the ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ in the proposed deal, Cllr Kevin Price, Executive Councillor for Housing, said: “In our discussions with government we have always been clear that the city council’s priority is to have the freedoms and funding to tackle the housing affordability crisis that threatens to limit Cambridge’s future growth and success, and secure the future viability of council housing for our tenants

 

More follows

“Our detailed analysis of the housing market in Cambridge has enabled us to provide the government with convincing evidence of the important role social rented housing can play in addressing the housing needs of the city, to enable and sustain its growth, which is also vital to the national economy.

“This fund, if agreed by the full Council, would enable the city council to start on the largest council house building programme in Cambridge in the last 40 years. It would provide hundreds of badly needed high quality new homes at truly affordable rent levels for those who live and work in Cambridge.

“Over time, the rent from these new homes will also enable us to invest in further house building. The debate with all councillors a week Monday will rightly cover all aspects of the devolution deal offer but I am pleased that our strong defence of council housing has resulted in a very favourable housing offer.”

Ends

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What Cambridge Evening News has to say

Notes for editors:

 release website

 

  1. Reports presented to council committees are available on the council’s website: http://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/ieDocHome.aspx;
  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email: lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email: tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email: castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

Cambridge City Council vote to consult on the proposal

(10-10-16) The results of the survey on Devolution are now available and will be discussed tonight at Strategy and Resources Committee and again at a specially constituted full council meeting....

1-10-16

Work to prepare the cafe for opening continues as residents who travel down Mill Road will no doubt have noticed.

 

1-7-16

Just had a very interesting meeting to hear about this exciting project which is starting right now in Romsey.

If anyone would like to help out then please contact

Susie Talbot 01223 699838 daat@cambridgeshire.gov.uk

George Davidson 01223 576874 ged251@yahoo.co.uk

 

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A new café will be opening on Mill Road later this year. Planning permission has been given, and building work is due to start in July. The cafe will occupy a building specially converted for its new use, and will incorporate a meeting room which will be available for both commercial and community groups to use.

One aim is to provide a safe and supportive space for those who are stable and motivated in recovery from drug or alcohol misuse to meet, volunteer, work and continue to empower their recovery journey; the other to provide a commercially viable business which will operate as part of the neighbourhood and as a community resource. The Hub café is a joint initiative between the service user community, Cambridgeshire DAAT Team led by Susie Talbot, and the treatment provider INCLUSION led by Paul Pescud; it will be a visible, active, public facing demonstration of the possibility of recovery; it will allow both the wider community and professionals to share skills, training, to host events for music, spoken word, art and IT access.

The design of the café has been led by local architect George Davidson who has made a significant contribution of professional work and is a keen supporter of the project:

‘I am passionate about the power of recovery from the misuse of drugs or alcohol and about this project; it is the most socially worthwhile project I have been involved with in a professional career spanning 37 years and I feel privileged to be a part of it. Although I run a busy architects practice, much of my life is now given to working with the Cambridgeshire drug and alcohol service, where I see lives being transformed through the passion of Susie Talbot, Paul Pescud and their teams. The first Recovery Café, 'THE BRINK', was opened by the Duchess of Cambridge in 2011 in Liverpool; since then, recovery hubs have been steadily emerging across the UK, driven in part by a public demand for sober and clean environments. This will be a great project for Cambridge; Public Health England thinks so and has given £100,000 to start it off. What we need now is another £55,000 to complete the building and open the cafe, so please help us'.

The service user involvement includes former service user Gem Blackburn who now runs her own consultancy ‘View from the edge’:

‘Nearly 13 years ago I stopped using heroin & crack, I had no idea how to live a life without drugs, I was lost, alone, desperate & angry. One of most important things that saved me and continues to keep me sane is the company of other recovering addicts. Those wonderful people encouraged me to value myself, empowered and encouraged me to help

others; they taught me how to be a better human. The Hub Café will offer us a place to belong, to be who we are, wherever we are on our journeys whilst giving recovery a visible forum within our local community. Recovery is not just about an individual, it's ripples spread further, family, friends, employers, one recovery seeds so many stories. We've made an amazing start so please support us to make our dream a reality'.

The café is being championed by the DAAT Co-ordinator Susie Talbot:

'This started as a vision over 2 years ago to fill a gap in our service, to help sustain long term recovery. In Cambridgeshire we have developed a team of 'recovery champions', individuals with lived experience, who work with us as volunteers and provide peer support; the Hub will provide a great opportunity to capture their energy and enthusiasm, and to gradually enable service users to take ownership of their business and lives'.

The café has been established as a Community Interest Company which is a form of social enterprise.

We have been moved and delighted by the offers of help and goodwill which the café has already attracted and we need to build on this to make the café a success. We are ambitious and intend to succeed. There is a huge skill set within the recovery community, ranging from professional and commercial experience in catering and management, through to bags of enthusiasm and a desire to make this work and a willingness to learn new skills; we are harnessing these.

The overwhelming view is that this is an important, worthwhile, correctly located, socially responsible, altruistic and philanthropic project for Cambridge, and we would therefore urge you all to give it the support it deserves and needs.

YOU CAN HELP. We need to provide kitchen and cafe equipment and furniture, as well as the outside seating area.

Any donations, particularly financial, would be welcome; all donors will be thanked personally, and recognised on a special plaque to be on permanent display in the cafe.

If you are able to help us, or want to find out more about us and the project, please contact:

Susie Talbot 01223 699838 daat@cambridgeshire.gov.uk

George Davidson 01223 576874 ged251@yahoo.co.uk

The Hub Café Steering Group. June 2016.

Susie Talbot, Paul Pescud, Tom Jefford, Lara Watkins, Gem Blackburn, Russell Bowyer, George Davidson.

 

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THE HUB CAFE: Brookfields, Mill Road, Romsey

1-10-16 Work to prepare the cafe for opening continues as residents who travel down Mill Road will no doubt have noticed.   1-7-16 Just had a very interesting meeting to hear...

 Meet Sophie Barnett - Romsey's New City Councillor 

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Sophie was elected to be Romsey's City Councillor by an almost 400 vote majority

 

Name Party Vote Comment
Sophie BARNETT Labour 1409 Elected
Roy BARTON Conservative 139  
Jane CARPENTER Green 273  
Catherine SMART* Liberal Democrat 1016  

Sophie (aged 30) is a Chartered Accountant who works for the NHS and is University of Cambridge graduate with a Classics degree. She joined the Labour Party because she believes in a fairer and more compassionate society. Sophie is particularly interested in housing and the efficient financial management of Cambridge City Council.

Sophie describes herself as enthusiastic, hard-working and determined.

As Romsey Labour's candidate, Sophie is the person that we will be canvassing for to win the next City Council election.

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You may have seen Sophie on one of her morning runs around the ward.

If not then you may have met Sophie when she has canvassed you at your own home, or at our stall outside the Coop on a Saturday.  Or you may have seen her at the Mill Road Winter Fair working on the stall that raised over £200 for Romsey Mill.  

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When the County Council proposed to turn many of our lights off in Cambridge, Sophie was a leading activist for the successful Labour Women's campaign to keep the street lights on (Keep Cambridge Lights Bright).  

 

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This campaign resulted in the County and the City Council sharing the cost of keeping the street lights on overnight (despite this being a cost that the County Council are responsible for).  

Sophie has a special responsibility for the Ridgeons development - so if you have any queries about that then contact her

Apart from frequent running around the ward, Sophie is a member of Cambridge Cycling Campaign and cycles to work at Addenbrooke's every day.  

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Sophie's hobbies are singing with the Dowsing Sound Collective, reading and spending time with family and friends.

Expect to see more of Sophie as Romsey Labour's campaign swings into gear over the next few months.

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 Team Romsey with Anthony Carpen

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Team Romsey at the Labour stall that raised over £200 for Romsey Mill at the Winter Fair

 

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Sophie can be emailed on sophie4labour@gmail.com

Alternatively you can tweet Sophie on @sophie4labour 

or

telephone on 07957 188 850

 

Meet Sophie Barnett - Romsey's New City Councillor

 Meet Sophie Barnett - Romsey's New City Councillor    Sophie was elected to be Romsey's City Councillor by an almost 400 vote majority   Name Party Vote Comment Sophie BARNETT... Read more

The plans to build more student accommodation in Romsey means no affordable housing.

To see and comment on the plans for this development go to this link

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Previously we had said:

In another good example of how we can all gain from consultations, the team planning the development of the Labour Club site met with Romsey councillors and EMRAG yesterday (2-2-15).  

The nursery, which labour had called for, remains in the current draft plan, but the majority of the accommodation in the draft plan presented for discussion was for student flats.  

For my part I argued that "what is wanted is homes for workers."  I called for at least 40% to be social housing and for the remainder to be homes aimed at Cambridge residents.   

The meeting was cordial and both groups have adjourned to review the situation.

For my part I remain clear - Romsey needs homes for local workers and that this should be reflected in this important local site. 

 

 

 

 11th July 2014

There was a meeting with the owner to discuss his plans for the Labour Club Building on the 11th July 2014 and he explained how his preliminary thoughts were to provide a space for a nursery (this was a labour suggestion), a retail unit, some community space and accommodation (potentially for students or professionals).  
The front face and side elevation will be retained.
Following the discussions we now await more concrete plans.

Many local people will have connections to this club. For some it will have been a regular or occasional watering hole. For others it will be the place where they arranged gigs and meetings. There will be many who held receptions, parties and events and for all these people this announcement will come both as a surprise and a regret.
Are we going to see developers try to knock it down and build yet more flats or will they try to work within the existing building? No one knows and this lack of knowledge will be a difficulty for anyone trying to challenge or even understand this change. People in Romsey that I talk to are getting very tired of the constant development and re-development and the lack of concern by developers for the wishes of the people.
Time will tell, and I suppose it is wrong to speculate too much but we are entitled to a say in any change of use or worse and I for one will be trying to organise support to ensure that democracy and localism can work.

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If we are going to save this historic building then we need to act fast, the club is now closed and we wait to see what the developers plan.
See what the Cambridge Evening News has to say

We need as much information as possible - let us know what you know?
Let us know what you want to do?

LEAVE YOU COMMENTS BELOW 

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LEAVE YOU COMMENTS BELOW 

Romsey Labour Club: the plans are out for 40 student flats on this site

The plans to build more student accommodation in Romsey means no affordable housing. To see and comment on the plans for this development go to this link      ...

Ridgeons Proposed Development Public Exhibition - Saturday 21st May

1000 - 1500 St Phillips Church

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9-12-15  THE RIDGEONS SITE DRAFT PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BRIEF SUPPLEMENATRY PLANNING DOCUMENT is now in the public arena and being discussed by the council.  

If you follow the link and go to page 7

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Update 26-3-15

This week has seen a flurry of activity on the development brief for the Ridgeon's Site and Romsey Labour have been prominent in this activity.  In particular Ridgeon's have heeded our call for a development brief and last night we started the process by which that brief will be developed.

Overall we argued that Romsey should benefit from this development: for the site to become part of the community with access for 'all' residents of Romsey and as a means to kickstart the Chisholm Trail and a new look Cromwell Road

In no particular order we argued that: 240 + homes are too many; that we want the space to be integrated in the community and not shut off from local people; a linear park to run along the back as part of the Chisholm Trail with benches and community space and perhaps even a cafe; for a bridge to be built over the railway allowing cycle and foot access to Petersfield; access for cycles and foot to Cavendish Road; for the homes to be a mix of affordable housing and houses for sale and that any medium rise buildings to be to the rear of the site away from the conservation area; that the character of the homes to be in keeping with the local area; for car parking to be within the site and hidden under the open spaces; for Cromwell Road to be closed off from Mill Road and then the road to be re-ordered to include green space that recognises that lorries and through traffic will be a thing of the past.

Further details will be provided as they become available but be assured your Romsey Team of Zoe, Dave and Anna will work to make sure this site provides benefits for the community.

UPDATE 2-3-15:

Dates for the diary

Cambridge Labour are closely following events in regards to Ridgeons' planned development and are pleased that Ridgeons have heeded Romsey Labour's call for a development brief.

 

Ridgeon's have appointed a planning team and have come up with the following three stages of consultation. 

This first stage is very much about fact finding and exploring issues and options.  It is for consultation to then inform any draft proposals which will be worked up in the Spring.


•       Stage1 – Themes & fact finding (mid-late March) 
•       Stage 2 - Draft design principles and framework plan (early June)
•       Stage 3 – Public consultation on draft SPD (early Sept)

Note that after Stage 3 the final version of the document (taking into account formal comment) cannot be adopted by the City Council until such time as the Local Plan has been adopted as the development brief effectively "hangs off" the Local Plan.

Stage 1 will be undertaken by PTE Architects (with support from Carter Jonas and GL Hearn) on behalf of Ridgeons, and with input from officers from the City Council.  Phase 1 will have three streams of activity:

•       Public exhibition and feedback on a handful of key themes through an interactive ‘post-it-note’ approach – Sat 21 March (time TBC between 10am and 4pm) at Ross Street Community Centre 
•       Residents/ community groups workshop on the same key themes – 23 March (7pm until 9pm, Wed 25 Mar) at Ross Street Community Centre (provisionally booked)
•       Online consultation in relation to the same key themes and to include an online feedback mechanism

Stage 2 will follow the same three-streams format as stage 1 but further details on approach will follow.
Stage 3 will be a six week consultation undertaken by Cambridge City Council.

GL Hearn are Ridgeon's communication consultants and are leading on the consultation, with input from council officers.  Consultation notices will be going out shortly and I will be updating local residents via EMRAG initially and GL Hearn are putting together consultation information as we speak.  GL Hearn are experienced working in Cambridge and fully aware of concerns raised by residents through the draft Local Plan process, including concerns over site density, traffic, design and other matters.  The development brief needs to fully address these concerns and engage residents in a meaningful and constructive way.
:)

dave

 

labour_team_big_-_Version_2.jpg 

 

UPDATE  December 2014

Romsey Labour Councillors Zoe and Dave support Anna Smith's view that theRE should be a development brief for the Ridgeons site. 

 

ridgeons_plan.jpg

Previously

As part of our ongoing protest against the way the previous administration handled the planning issue at Ridgeons, Dave took advantage of the opportunity for members of the public to speak at the council meeting on Thursdays.  Dave started by challenging the proposal to overdevelop the site by allowing 245 'units' of accommodation on the Ridgeons site. Dave also asked if the Ridgeons development would open up onto Cavendish Road and the LibDems did nothing to re-assure Dave or the residents that this would not happen.  

Instead they tried to salvage a position whereby they are at odds with their residents by a last minute inclusion of a clause requiring site promoters to produce a development brief and demonstrate integration with the existing area was.  This is too little too late and the same goes for the suggestion about testing of vehicle access.  We should have started from a position where these restrictions were considered in the plan.  By accepting 75 dwellings per hectare on the site the council have left residents to appeal to the inspector.  

That is not what should happen - a council should represent their residents not suggest an open ended plan and then leave us to fight at the inspector and final planning stage.  The LibDem fudge with an amendment that meant nothing - playing politics with a problems that could have be dealt before the plans went to the inspector.  The council's approach puts the residents on the back foot - when the plans get to the inspector we should not be fighting uphill against a LibDem recommendation!  Far better that the council accepted a reduction in the amount of dwellings allowed and sorted out a preferred access and left it to the developer to challenge rather than the other way around

Democracy and Localism are meaningless when councils take this approach to their constituents - so to is the concept that you elect a councillor to represent you!

It's not as if it were a few people moaning there were over 500 people who signed the petition and over 80 made formal individual objections to the plan.

Labour Councillor Zoe Moghadas also spoke against the overdevelopment.  

The plan was passed and now we have to plan how we can challenge it at the inspector level. The overdevelopment and access to the site at Ridgeons is something that Romsey Labour have given a real profile to.  We will continue to act against the lack of democracy in allowing this into the draft plan so far we have delivered leaflets, collected signatures, got an undertaking from the Labour Party, spoken at Council and East Area.  

21st May - Ridgeons: Public Exhibition

Ridgeons Proposed Development Public Exhibition - Saturday 21st May 1000 - 1500 St Phillips Church       9-12-15  THE RIDGEONS SITE DRAFT PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BRIEF SUPPLEMENATRY PLANNING DOCUMENT... Read more

Sophie at the 'Keep Cambridge Lights Bright' demonstrationOn April 1st, the streetlights went out in much of Cambridgeshire as a result of County Council cuts. However, in Cambridge, they have stayed bright, and we are proud of the key role Sophie Barnett, our City Council candidate, played in this campaign.

As co-chair of Cambridge Labour Women's Forum's 'Keep Cambridge Lights Bright', Sophie helped to lead a powerful campaign. She says, "When we heard about the County’s proposals we wanted to make sure that Cambridge residents were aware of the plans and also to highlight our concerns about the County’s ideas.  We spoke to people across the city, delivered leaflets and organised an illuminated walk to Shire Hall to highlight our concerns.

"We were concerned that switching off the streetlights would adversely affect a large number of Cambridge residents. Cambridge has a vibrant night time economy with lots of people out and about at night or early in the morning including shift workers, commuters and students – all of these people would have faced travelling to and from home in darkness along Cambridge’s narrow and often obstructed pavements. We were also worried that the switch-off would disproportionately affect vulnerable residents for example, women walking home alone and disabled or elderly residents unable to negotiate the dark pavements. With no streetlights, the roads would have also been more dangerous for cyclists and pedestrians."

 

Over 1200 Cambridge residents responded to a county-wide survey saying that they wanted to keep the lights on. With the sophie_quotation_2.jpgthreat of Cambridge going dark, the Labour-led city council stepped in and negotiated with Cambridgeshire County Council. County planned originally to cease all residential street lighting from midnight, but later agreed to fund lighting to 2am. The City Council then offered to keep lights on from 2am to 6am. While some Parish and Town Councils are keeping overnight lights on, Cambridge is the only district in the county where all lights are staying on through the night.

 

City Council Leader, Lewis Herbert, says "At under 40p per city resident, we believe the cost to keep the lights on is a price well worth paying. Areas like Romsey are different to Ramsey or isolated rural cottages in the middle of nowhere. Romsey and Cambridge need their overnight street lighting so people travelling late will be both safer and feel safer, and so families and friends at home can sleep soundly.

"We are glad that the deal we struck, and the good relations we have with the County Council, means there is no blackout from the start of April and the new financial year as happened in other counties, and the deal also sees the County Council contributing financially to lighting after midnight, again unlike towns and councils in Essex like Harlow also keeping their lights after the county decision to cut them."

(The City Council also asked the County Council about the viability of replacing the existing Balfour Beatty PFI lights with new LED lights but the County Council refused to fund this initiative.)

 

Romsey Labour is proud of the City Council and especially proud of the key role our very own Sophie played in keeping our lights on. As she says, "It’s important for residents to have their say in what happens in Cambridge. Through our campaign we were able to make residents’ voices heard. This ultimately led to the streetlights staying on thanks to the Labour-led City Council’s intervention." We know this successful campaign is a sign of what's to come from Sophie if she is elected in May. She is a powerful and energetic voice for Romsey and for the City.

Cambridge Streetlights Saved: Thanks to Sophie and the City Council

On April 1st, the streetlights went out in much of Cambridgeshire as a result of County Council cuts. However, in Cambridge, they have stayed bright, and we are proud of the...

Dave Baigent, Police and Crime Commissioner Candidate

For further details follow the link   Read more

13-3-16

Labour party acting on Student Accommodation.

COUNCIL TO UNDERTAKE STUDY ON STUDENT ACCOMMODATION NEEDS

CAMBRIDGE City Council is commissioning a study to investigate the levels of demand for and supply of student accommodation in Cambridge, and its impact on the local housing market.

Following submission of the Local Plan for examination in March 2014, issues relating to the provision of student accommodation have been raised by local residents and interest groups.

The council also recently received an appeal decision for 315 - 349 Mill Road, where an appeal was allowed for student accommodation on land allocated for housing in the current and emerging Local Plans.

The results of the new study will support the council in dealing with Local Plan hearing sessions on student accommodation, which should take place later this year.

A key outcome of this study will be a greater level of information on the growth of institutions, particularly Anglia Ruskin University, and the need for different forms of accommodation.

The council needs further information to understand whether it is making adequate provision for students over the plan period.

We hope that this study will provide us with a greater understanding of the impact of the growing student population on housing supply.”

The study will be completed later this year and the findings will be discussed at the council’s Development Plan Scrutiny Sub-Committee.

 

29-1-16

Romsey Labour are still in shock that McLaren were able to overturn the City Council's decision to refuse them planning permission for student accommodation.  

It is a real sign of who the Tory Government represent when their inspector overrules a democratically elected council to allow a speculator to build on a site designated for homes.

I suppose being a labour party member gives me a slightly different slant but I really don't know how these developers sleep at night given they know they are taking houses away from the community and building student flats just to make a profit.  

It has to be said that the LibDems were completely silent throughout this campaign - we would have thought that they would have an argument on this. 

The Cambridge News provides a clear comment on the outcome of McLaren appeal - so follow this link to read it and the inspector's report.

the_crew_mill_roa.jpg

I have tweeted on this

When students ate residents.

There are many advantages 2 living in a university town.

One of them is not when speculators use them 4 profit.

 

 

 

 

10-12-15

The McLaren Appeal

I spoke at the appeal and Anna Smith sent in a letter that was read out.

I guess my tweet perhaps best sums up how I feel about the process 

"At McLaren appeal - dont understand the technicalities but the process seems 2 be 2 try &grind the city's officer in2 the ground"

 

What follows is a letter I wrote to the Cambridge News, report supplied by EMRAG and then a Cambridge News Article.

Letter to Cambridge News

Thank you for your report on the McLaren appeal to build student flats on land designated by the City Council for residential accommodation.

What is important to me as a City Councillor is that McLaren’s attempt to hijack land allocated for homes takes no consideration of the needs of the people who want to live and work in Cambridge. 

If this appeal succeeds then it could open the floodgates for even more land allocated for housing to be developed as student accommodation.  All this at a time when we are struggling to provide more homes for people who work in the city.

I have followed this situation from the time when I first met with McLaren and tried to persuade them to recognise that this land was set in the City Plan for housing.  At that time and in two subsequent meetings, aware that we had held a public meeting that spoke against the McLaren plan, they were intransigent – it was their intention to build student accommodation. 

When McLaren pressed ahead, I with a number of others addressed the planning committee before it considered and then turned down McLaren’s plans.

And so we then found ourselves in an appeal with McLaren’s QC arguing points of law on behalf of a company intent on building student accommodation on land democratically designated by the City Council for private accommodation (including at least 40% affordable housing). 

Several local people spoke out against the development at the appeal and I spoke for the people of Romsey.  No one from the community spoke in favour.  ARU never even attended, leaving open our suggestion that this accommodation is not even being built for ARU but for a growing market of crammer and language schools. 

As I told the inspector, in Romsey we were not anti student – students live amongst us and are a growing part of our community.  But what is important is balance: a balance that the City Council was trying to strike between the needs of students and the needs of people who want to live ‘permanently’ in Cambridge.

I went on to say that if this appeal is allowed it would unbalance the council’s plans that were echoing the views of the people of Cambridge.  Views expressed through the ballot box, in formal consultations and on the doorsteps in the democracy that is Cambridge.

Dave Baigent, City Councillor and candidate for Police and Crime Commissioner.

 

Mill Road: Former garage site now owned by the Co-op

Appeal against City Council rejection of planning application for 270  Student Flats by  Mclaren

 

Residents have repeatedly stated in surveys and at a well attended public meeting that they would like to see a mixture of affordable and market housing on this site, including much needed homes for families in Romsey. They have also stated that they would like to see open space on the site as there is none in the immediate area.

 

If Mclaren win this appeal there will be:

  • No residential housing
  • No public open space

 

A. Is there a  need for student housing on this site ?

 

1. City Council claim:

i. That ARU only aspire to house 2/3rds of first year students, and that this need is met. The City Council cannot hope to identify land that would accommodate all 7,000 plus  ARU students.

ii. That there is no evidence that building student flats returns previously rented properties to the open market as family homes.

iii. That this site is suitable for at least 33 new houses, and that this is vital if Cambridge is going to meet its housing needs.

iv. Giving permission for student flats on this site would set a precedent that other developers would try to do the same thing elsewhere. Although the number of houses may seem small, most of the other sites available within the city are small, and the arguments used by Mclaren on Mill Road could be applied to these  sites too, leading to a critical shortage of housing in the future.

 

2. Mclaren claim:

i.  That there is a critical unmet shortage of student accommodation

ii. That building student flats  means houses presently rented by students will return to use as family housing.

iii. That the 'emerging' Local Plan which identifies this site for housing should be given less weight as it was still going through review process.

iv. That the existing Local Plan (2006) is out of date and due to expire shortly.

v. That the existing Local Plan designated use for this site for residential use and affordable housing which 'which could be for ARU' is outdated now that planning permission has been given for the adjoining Mosque

 

3. Local residents spoke about the need for housing on this site. These included Romsey Councillors Dave Baigent and Anna Smith ; Colin Wiles,  Anne Beamish and Allan Brigham from EMRAG;  Frank Gawthrop from  South Petersfield Resident's Association, and   Shahid Hanif on behalf of the Muslim Academic Trust.

 

4. Frank Gawthrop provided a well researched information pack for the planning inspector illustrating  that ARU had failed in the past to occupy housing that had been built on the basis that their students would use it. This accommodation was now used by the constantly expanding 6th Form Crammers.

 

5. Colin Wiles stated that most ARU students could not afford to live in purpose built student accommodation where the rents are approx £9,000 pa.  A shared house is significantly cheaper.

 

 

 

B: Open Space:

 

1. The Council abandoned  its original objections which stated that the  Open Space on this site was inadequate  in return for a Section 106 agreement guaranteeing financial contributions if Mclaren won. It  is claimed that if the Council had not done this, and then lost the Appeal, it would not have got any financial contribution  in return for Mclaren's failure to provide required open space on the site.  Is this the way to make decisions ?

 

2. Residents have asked why the City Council has  Open Space standards for new developments when it is  constantly taking cash payments instead ? Too often the money acquired is then used in existing open spaces when the identified need is for more open space close to housing.

 

2.1  In this case  there is no open space between Coleridge Rd and Montreal Rd – and even the semi-public open spaces provided by the former Romsey School playground and the Royal Standard garden have been lost to housing.

 

2.3 Putting facilities on Coldhams Common and Parker’s Piece does not  enhance the open space provision for residents of  Suez or Hobart Road. This is what happened with the Royal Standard too, where  developers built over the existing garden. The City Council took a cash payment to put open space somewhere else – definitely not in an easy walk of The Royal Standard.

 

2.4 Adding new equipment to Romsey Recreation Ground would mean that the park would , as the Council's original case states, ' be likely to be subject to even heavier use than it currently experiences, impacting on the quality and availability of provision'. ( Cambridge City Council Statement of Case: 4 Sept 2015)

 

 3.  The City Council’s own  Open Space and Recreation Strategy states that if this site comes forward:  'the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Romsey ward.’

 

4. It is proposed to spend £30,000  of the Section 106 income  to build  climbing  walls/boulders on Romsey Rec.  Much of the remainder of the income will be spent on Parker's Piece or Coldhams Common.

  

4.1. The last council Consultation on Romsey Recreation Ground was only five years ago. The Consultant clearly concluded that more equipment on top of that which was in the refurbishment would destroy the character of the various spaces in what is a small and already well-used park (the Council officers had originally suggested a MUGPA  - games area - tennis court,  and other  equipment). 

 

4.2 The Consultant also defined Romsey Recreation Ground  as a ‘neighbourhood park’. A climbing feature such as that suggested would make it a city-wide attraction and as such could change the character of the park. 

 

The Future of Romsey Rec: Conclusion. Phil Back.

We are also very mindful of the consultation feedback that indicates that structural changes should be kept to a minimum and that the open space should be conserved in any changes.  We believe that the present structure of the park, with different areas allowing different activities, offers a diverse range of opportunities and should remain.

 

4.3 The proposal to take Section 106 payments in lieu of open space on the proposed  student housing  site illustrates all the faults of the existing planning process. If the students need recreational facilities they should follow the guidelines defined in the City Council's Open Space and Recreation Strategy ' to avoid further negative impact on deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Romsey ward.’

 

East Mill Road Action Group.

..............................................................................

 

 

Taken from the Cambridge News 

‘Eye-watering’ prices of Cambridge student flats prompts 'gold rush' among developers

By Cambridge News  |  Posted: December 09, 2015

  • McLaren

    Mill Road student flats

VIEW GALLERY
 Comments (7)

The "gold rush" by developers to build student accommodation in Cambridge has been condemned by a community fighting plans for hundreds of flats – while the city faces a "chronic shortage" of housing.

There are fresh fears about the recent flood of applications as it emerged some student rooms were being marketed for £13,000 a year – with claims they are destined for use by students at similarly pricey institutions.

Councillors and residents have made their case to a government planning inspector, as developer McLaren appealed against a decision to turn down its plans for 270 student flats in Mill Road.

But the arguments capture a complex debate that has engulfed communities across Cambridge, as developers cash-in on arguably the most lucrative form of development currently available in the city.

RELATED CONTENT

This debate includes looming changes to local planning laws, and the expansion of both Anglia Ruskin University and other educational institutions.

Residents at last week's appeal accused Anglia Ruskin of being "extremely disorganised" and "very difficult to pin down" when it comes to their housing policy – prompting questions about who will end up living in these new flats.

"We would suggest there is a gold rush going on of student developers in Cambridge, and that the bigger picture is about the crammers and the language schools," said Colin Wiles, housing campaigner and chairman of the East Mill Road Action Group.

"The needs of Anglia Ruskin are central to this appeal. I think the evidence from the council has shown it's very difficult to pin them down.

"One of the issues that has arisen is Anglia Ruskin has taken on schemes in recent years which they've subsequently passed onto other education institutions such as language schools, or what we call 'crammers', for which there is a huge demand in Cambridge for its status and its brand.

"The bigger picture is that this site will contribute to housing needs in this city. It's an important site, local people want general needs housing and affordable housing on this site.

"They do not want a student housing scheme that will be gated, without any car parking or public open space, and turns its back on the local area."

The Cheddars Lane development was opposed by the community

 

The raw numbers appear to back the need for more student accommodation.

Figures presented by McLaren at last week's planning hearing say nearly a third of first years at Anglia Ruskin live in the private rented sector in Cambridge.

This compares to an average of 17 per cent nationally, with first years typically housed in purpose-built halls by their university.

The figures also claim Anglia Ruskin will be facing a deficit between students and rooms of more than 8,000 rooms by 2031.

But these figures were contested by the council, Romsey's Cllr Dave Baigent and residents.

Council officer Joanna Gilbert-Wooldridge said the university "has not provided sufficient evidence" of its need, and Cllr Baigent said a third of Anglia Ruskin students lived locally anyway, before they started studying there.

There was also uncertainty about the numbers of Anglia Ruskin students studying part time or doing 'sandwich' courses for only a year, which critics say muddies the figures.

Resident Frank Gawthrop, meanwhile, said hundreds of student rooms had been given up by Anglia Ruskin since the turn of the century at Varsity House.

There is also general uncertainty as to just how much Anglia Ruskin and Cambridge's other education establishments will grow over the next 15 years, or how their housing needs will change.

Steve Bennett, Anglia Ruskin's secretary and clerk, said: "We continue to be supportive of cluster accommodation in locations that are attractive to our students."

He also said it had contractual arrangements for private sector accommodation in the city that restricted their use.

New plans have been submitted for Wests garage in Newmarket Road

 

Mr Gawthrop went on to highlight the "eye watering" prices of student flats in the city – studio flats at the new Railyard on CB1 cost between £8,200 and £13,200 per year – and the expansion of private institutions such as CATS College.

This caters for students from around the world and charges nearly £30,000 for a single GCSE and A-level course.

It now has capacity for more than 1,000 students.

"If you've got parents who are prepared to provide that kind of cash, forking out that much for a room is really not surprising," Mr Gawthrop said.

"It demonstrates that in the Cambridge housing market, the Anglia Ruskin students can be completely blown away by the crammers.

"I have questioned the officers at Anglia Ruskin about their housing policy and I have to say they are extremely disorganised.

"I don't know if it's they just don't care about their students or don't have the capacity to plan ahead, but my experience is they really don't have a very clear idea of the way forward."

Anglia Ruskin has not taken up its nomination rights for 342 of the 584 rooms at the Railyard, meaning they are not exclusively for its students.

The rents for Anglia Ruskin's nominated cluster flats cost £6,700 per year.

An insider, though, told the News yesterday that the Railyard was full of university students – although this could be about to change.

A concept picture of the proposed new student development at the Histon Road and Huntingdon Road junction

 

Cambridge City Council planning chief Cllr Kevin Blencowe has defended looming changes that will see student flats marketed to institutions beyond Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin universities.

The proposals are included in the emerging local plan for the city, as current rules restrict new student developments to the universities.

One insider told us the rules had been put in place to restrict the growth of language schools and so-called 'crammers'.

"We're not lifting the restriction – we're just broadening it out a bit, to include the established sixth-form centres that have been here 10 or 15 years," said Cllr Blencowe.

Student flats are now already being marketed to reflect this change in the pipeline.

Evidence submitted by McLaren also says the city council "was unable to obtain reliable data" for the growth of language schools and other specialist schools.

Cllr Blencowe went on to criticise "a disconnect" between Anglia Ruskin, developers and the council over what is coming forward, with many developments predominantly proposing studio flats rather than cheaper cluster flats, where students share a kitchen.

Cllr Blencowe also warned about the "bigger picture" of a relaxation of rules around university expansion, which has given them the ability to offer more courses to more students than ever.

"In national terms I can understand the desire to provide more courses for more students, because we want to increase the skills base," said Cllr Blencowe.

"But in Cambridge we have a complicated source of pressures which are then impacted – there's a huge demand for housing of every need. The more people that compete for that, the more pressure there is."

The Mill Road site is earmarked for more than 150 homes in the emerging local plan – but a much more modest allocation in the currently adopted one.

And McLaren says this means the city council cannot argue the strategic need for this housing, especially as the city is well on course to meet its 'five-year housing supply' as defined by the Government.

Hundreds of new student flats have been provided at CB1

 

Developers also frequently argue that providing purpose-built student rooms will free up the private rented accommodation currently occupied by students.

But Cllr Baigent said there was a "chronic shortage" or residential accommodation in Romsey, and the whole city.

"I appreciate the efforts of McLaren to get local buy-in with this proposal," he said.

"I have had a number of meetings with them, and at each they have been left in no doubt about the views of the 7,000 voters of Romsey.

"I have pleaded with them to compromise their proposals to represent the city plan. McLaren, however, remain implacable.

"As a politician I have tried hard to avoid this very situation that we are now – but McLaren have refused to budge."

A flurry of 'windfall sites' – those not allocated for a specific reason in the local plan – have been proposed for student accommodation in recent times.

Two of these at the pre-application are also in Romsey, at the NHS site on Vinery Road and at the former Romsey Labour Club on Mill Road.

The latest figures from Cambridge City Council show 2,309 private homes were exempt from council tax as they were occupied solely by students.

In addition, there were a further 1,243 properties designated as halls of residence and 643 'student disregards' where students were living with non-students.

Allan Brigham, a fellow member of the East Mill Road Action Group, recently quizzed councillors on why the restriction on student accommodation being occupied by university students was being lifted.

"There may be an argument for the planning system to look favourably on the provision of accommodation for students at the two universities, as it does in the existing Local Plan," Mr Brigham said.

"But there is no argument to justify including sixth form crammers who are simply using the 'Cambridge' name to charge large fees.

"The proposed change to the local plan simply widens the market for student flats and pushes up their sale value. It is already being flagged up as an incentive to buyers.

"Many local residents would ask why they are forced to live in Littleport or Huntingdon, and to drive back to Cambridge to work or to see family and friends, while students appear to be entitled to live near their place of work."

Stats

Anglia Ruskin

Purpose-built student accommodation available to ARU students

Exclusive to ARU

Accommodation Bedrooms
Peter Taylor House 254
Swinhoe Hall 121
Anastasia House 68
Harston House 260
CB1 511
The Forum 111
Sedley Court 150
The Railyard 244
YMCA 28
University shared houses 90
TOTAL 1,837

Directly let accommodation not solely for use by ARU

Accommodation Bedrooms
The Railyard 342
Brunswick House 251
Purbeck House 151
Chestnut House 97
Study Inn 220
TOTAL 1,061

Number of student living in the private rented sector

  First-year students All students
  2013/14 2012/13 2013/14
ARU Cambridge campus (no.) 1,135 3,230 3,400
ARU Cambridge campus (%) 29 34.3 35.8
ARU all campuses (%) 25 28.9 30.2
UK average (%) 17 29.9 30.4

An email sent by the university's residential services manager says Anglia Ruskin expects about two thirds of new students to seek university accommodation

The Higher Education Statistics Authority says of Anglia Ruskin's 9,495 students at its Cambridge campus in 2013/14, 29 per cent are likely to live outside Cambridge.

So it is unclear about the future demographics of Anglia Ruskin in terms of a) the number of students who will live outside Cambridge, and b) the number who will rent in the private sector.

Both of these are currently well above the national average for Anglia Ruskin here in Cambridge.

The demand – how much student accommodation is needed?

Cambridge City Council presented these figures to the planning inspector at last week's hearing.

They are based on meeting the University of Cambridge's target of housing 100 per cent of undergraduates and 90 per cent of postgraduates.

It is also based on accommodating the growth of students at Anglia Ruskin – and not dealing with any existing shortfall in student accommodation for ARU.

  2011 Increase 2011 to 2031
University of Cambridge    
Undergraduates 11,948 1,188
Postgraduates 6,295 2,876
Supply of rooms 14,993  
Demand for rooms   17,614
Need for new rooms   3,776
     
Anglia Ruskin    
Undergraduates 7,600 797
Postgraduates 1,300 632
Supply of rooms 2,000  
Need for new rooms   1,429

However, alternative work submitted by McLaren calls the city council's calculations "incomplete and inaccurate".

It applies the same target of housing 100 per cent of undergraduates and 90 per cent of postgraduates to Anglia Ruskin - resulting in a shortfall of more than 8,000 student beds for ARU by 2031.

  2011 2031 Increase 2011 to 2031
University of Cambridge      
Undergraduates 11,948 13,201 1,253
Postgraduates 6,295 9,354 3,059
Supply of rooms 14,993 14,993  
Demand for rooms 17,614 21,620 4,006
Need for new rooms 2,621 6,627 4,006
       
Anglia Ruskin      
Undergraduates 7,600 8,397 797
Postgraduates 1,300 1,932 632
Supply of rooms 2,000 2,000  
Demand for rooms 8,770 10,136 1,366
Need for new rooms 6,770 8,136 1,366

The schemes in the pipeline

Planning permission with potential to serve ARU

Hilltop Day Centre – 30 beds

1 Milton Road – 211 beds

Elizabeth House, Chesterton High Street – 261 beds

73 Humberstone Road – 15 beds

Cambridge Railway, Station Road – 351 beds

Cheddars Lane – 318 beds

TOTAL – 1,186 NEW BEDS

Other planning permissions

Chancellors Court, Greshams Road – 20 beds

Homerton College, Hills Road – 120 beds

Westminster College, Madingley Road – 9 beds

Bells School, Babraham Road – 100 beds

1-8 St Clements Road – 72 beds

North West Cambridge – 2,325 beds

Homerton Business Centre, Purbeck Road – 132 beds

TOTAL – 2,778 BEDS

Other applications awaiting decision

3 Barton Road (to serve Darwin College) – 26 beds

Castle Court – 342 beds

156-160 Chesterton Road – 41 beds

315-349 Mill Road – 270 beds (application rejected but under appeal)

Wests Garage, Newmarket Road – 200 beds (application rejected but under appeal, new developer also preparing fresh plans)

80 Maids Causeway – 16 beds

TOTAL – 895 BEDS

From the city council's annual monitoring report

Student units completed April 2011 to April 2015 – 1,810

Number of market houses completed April 2011 to April 2015 – 2,860

"Cambridge has seen significant provision of new student accommodation since 1 April 2011. Between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2015, 1,810 student units were completed.

"At 1 April 2015, there were a further 356 student units with planning permission but not yet built and 914 student units under construction.

"This provides a total of 3,080 student units built or with planning permission by April 2015.

"Significant development has been completed around the Station Area this year and constitutes 576 student completions.

"Major developments currently under construction include: Elizabeth House (1 High Street, Chesterton), which will provide 261 student units; Homerton Business Centre (Purbeck Road), which is set to provide 132 units; and 1 Milton Road, which will account for 211 units.

"There are also four further substantial student unit developments around the city which will account for 302 student units (all figures are net)."

From the city council's officer report about the Mill Road application

"Anglia Ruskin University expects 0.5 per cent undergraduate and 2 per cent postgraduate growth per annum, equating to 1,421 additional students (by 2031).

"They have not supplied data on their expectations of housing them in student accommodation, however Anglia Ruskin University generally houses a lower percentage of students in purpose built accommodation.

"It is noted that Anglia Ruskin University has provided a letter in support of the proposed development and has highlighted the need to accommodate first year undergraduates.

"However, Anglia Ruskin University has provided no information on their overall need for student accommodation and how this relates to their aspirations for growth."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update 4th March 2015

I spoke from the floor at the Planning Committee today and argued that the existing local plan, the development brief and the upcoming local plan all designate this site for the provision of houses.  I also made it clear that I had in several meetings with McLaren advised them that the people of Cambridge needed houses and yet unfortunately they had continued to push to build rooms for students.

The planning committee turned it down- one libdem voted for it. 

Anna Smith, Dave and Zoe are once again pushing for a buyer to come forward to build houses on this site - it has remained empty for too long.

:)

dave

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FEBRAURY 28th 2015 

McLaren's plan for student rooms comes up for consideration on the 4th March at the Guildhall

FEBRUARY 6th 2015

THERE ARE REVISED PLANS OUT FOR THIS DEVELOPMENT reducing the number to 270

https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=NCGEUIDXHZP00

 

https://idox.cambridge.gov.uk/online-applications/files/B648D1BFEF0EF9D7EB6FBCCCD0A74B42/pdf/14_1496_FUL-3._REVISED_D02-100_GROUND_FLOOR_PLAN_210115-1704040.pdf

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Summary

The application plan can be found at the City Council Website

McLaren Planning Statement part one and part two

Romsey Labour met as a matter of urgency to discuss this plan and decided to continue their objections

The McLaren Plan (layout)

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The McLaren Elevations

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The plan is for this accommodation to be built for Anglia Ruskin Students

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 ARU View

McLaren_ARU_view.jpg

 

 

 

Romsey Labour will be meeting as a matter of urgency to discuss this plan - watch this page for further updates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2013

Developers plans to build accommodation for 331 students discussed by over 80 people at open meeting

 

Follow this link for the report of Dave's presentation to the Full City Council on 3rd May 

www.millroadcambridge.co.uk 

 

Planning Statement part one and part two

Listening to the voice of the people of Romsey: Over 80 people attend the open meeting at Ross Street Community Centre on Monday 24th March to discuss the accommodation that is being planned for 331 students on Mill Road  

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Over 80 residents attended the meeting about more student accommodation on the Mill Road site next to Brookfields hospital. Dave Baigent organised the meeting to get the views of local residents on this plan by developers for over 300 student rooms.

The developers, McLaren had twice been invited to the meeting, but declined to attend, giving different reasons each time. Planning officers from the city council, local councillors Zoe Moghadas and Catherine Smart , and members of East Mill Road Action Group were present and spoke about the developer’s proposal for over 300 student rooms.

 Most of the speakers from the floor were unhappy with the proposal- a number of issues came up:

Car parking. Many students already had cars, although they were not supposed to. The problem was in monitoring the cars – facilities for this were limited. The new development had no car spaces for students, so this could be a major pronlem.

District Plan

Under the current district plan, the possibility for up to 40% student housing (or affordable housing) could be allowed. But the other 60% must be normal flats or houses.

It was recognised that students do have to live somewhere, but EMRAG Colin Wiles pointed out that in recent years, most of the housing that had been built in the city was for students, not long term residents. Much of the student accommodation was taken up by wealthy students from “crammers” who could afford higher rents, and this was clearly a tempting opportunity for developers. The problems raised by high numbers of students, often in poorly maintained housing was also brought up, eg bins left out, no interest in the local community, high turnover of population leading to lack of community feeling.

The planners pointed out that the proposed development had not been submitted to the council yet – likely to be in by June. The proposal would be coming at the end of the present District plan, when the new one was coming in. This could be a problem.

Many people favoured normal housing for the site, which could still be profitable for the developers.

 

The chair, Dave Baigent thanked the council officers  coming to the meeting and for their help, and urged people to make their views known using the websites of the developer and the council, completing the feedback forms at the meeting and letting their councillors know. More information would be distributed when the final plan was submitted. 

Dave chaired the meeting and said:

"I am a great believer in Councillor's listening to the voice of the people and after the fiasco of Cromwell Road where residents arguments were ignored I set up this meeting to first listen to what people have to say, then think about it and then find a way to action their thoughts.  Nearly every person who attended spoke and many of them spoke more than once.  Now that is democracy in action.  It became clear from the meeting that people believed that the council had no strategy for student accommodation.  In fact the council couldn't even answer a question asking 'how many students lived in Romsey.'  Given that there is no council tax collected from houses occupied by students, this should have been something that the ruling party should have known.  Getting an answer to this question is a priority because this will indicate if 30% of the residents of Romsey are in fact students as has been suggested." 

Dave went on to say:

"It is time the ruling party listened to the voice of people and properly represented them, and I would argue that their neglect in this area makes it time for a change.  I am arguing to control the 'rogue landlords' that were spoken of at the meeting and the best way to do this is to start by making them register with the council so we know who are the owners of the houses of multiple occupancy.  It is also time to recognise that whilst there is no argument with students per se, we need to be aware of the balance between students and longer term residents.  We also need to recognise that developers are in it for the money not to provide us with a better community; they couldn't even be bothered to attend the meeting and as a resident said, 'developers seem to believe that they can brush us and the council to one-side - after last night I for one will ensure that doesn't happen.  This shouldn't be about party politics but it is.  The LibDems are following the ConDeb government's position, which is to push for the market to take care of our needs.  This isn't happening in Romsey because the developers are only looking after their needs: the Cromwell Road developments, with a lack of green space, insufficient car parking is enough proof that developers are taking advantage!  More importantly it is proof that the council are not prepared to stand up to the developers or to represent their residents!"  

 

 

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Anglia Ruskin University were invited and sent their apologies and made a comment on their position.

McLaren (the developers) were invited and sent their apologies.  Follow link to see McLaren's refusal and the correspondence.

Anglia Ruskin Students Union were invited and did not respond.

If you are disabled and need assistance then please email Dave Baigent or ring 07802 495 329

The current plans for this development appear at the bottom of this page

Overview of the site in Salmon Pink

old_coop_site.jpg

 

Interviews in Cambridge Evening News and the replies indicate a mixed bag of feelings

Comment by Muslim Academic Trust on this development  (10-3-14) this has caused a flurry of replies in Cambridge Evening News.

Comments by Colin Wiles (EMRAG) in the Cambridge Evening News. you may want to read the comments.

 

Development of the site owned by the Coop in Mill Road some early questions

The residents of Romsey need to ask 'do we want over 331 units of student accommodation that is built right up onto the roadway, if so will it be in a firm relationship with ARU or is it likely that as on other sites this accommodation goes to language schools.  As an alternative would the people of Romsey prefer the developers to submit alternative plans for affordable family housing?

We also need to ask if the developers claim that students will not be allowed cars can be 'policed' and if not what is the likely impact on local parking in the adjacent streets? 

The council have already produced a report on this site suggesting a mixed development.

SO what are the developers planning?

WHO would be able to afford the £150 per week they are suggesting as a starter figure for the rent?

McLaren Property is proposing 331 new student rooms.

The proposal includes:

  • 42 one-bedroom studios
  • 11 studios for disabled residents
  • 98 en-suite self-contained study rooms
  • 180 study rooms in shared townhouses, in a range of sizes
  • Shared amenity space including laundry facilities, common rooms and shared living spaces
  • Secure cycle storage, encouraging active use of cycles by students in residence
  • A total of 331 new rooms arranged inbuildings of up to 4 storeys

There is an opportunity to comment to the developers at http://www.millroadcambridge.co.uk/

I am very interested to hear residents views - contact me dave.baigent@fitting-in.com or call round to 96 Cavendish Road. 

There will be many arguments for and against this project and most importantly people need to make their voice heard and the council need to listen. I am tired of hearing about democracy and localism and then finding that at the end of the day the residents voices are ignored. Take the Ridgeons site we collected over 500 signatures against, we made formal responses to the local plan. The LIbDem city councillors did not attend the protest meetings and at the end of the day they passed the draft plan. For my part I believe we need houses to be built for families, but if elected I will represent what the people say and will not avoid protest meetings. 

The Romsey Conservation Area

romsey-ca.jpg

To follow developments and have a say go tohttp://romsey.cambridgelabour.org.uk/coop

Links to some of the relevant documents below:

  • The original development brief can be viewed here
  • The local plan that currently applies can be viewed here
  • The latest draft local plan can be viewed here 
  • The group planning to build on this site have produced two documents.  These can be viewed here one  and  two 

 

 

 

The current view from Mill Road

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Current plans for this development

Ground_Floor_Plan_.jpgGround_Floor_Plan_.jpg1st_to_2nd_Floor_Plan.jpg3rd_Floor_Plan.jpg

 

 

 

 

Dave Baigent

Dave Baigent took the opportunity to visit the Baptist Church on Mill Road on Thursday to see the 'consultation' on plans to develop accommodation for over 300 students on this site and he really wants to hear your views - write comments below.

 

 

 

Council Acting on Student Accommodation

13-3-16 Labour party acting on Student Accommodation. COUNCIL TO UNDERTAKE STUDY ON STUDENT ACCOMMODATION NEEDS CAMBRIDGE City Council is commissioning a study to investigate the levels of demand for and... Read more

The Romsey Labour team were out on Mill Road today campaigning against the 25% rise in rail fares.

It was very very cold but we had the spirit of Labour to keep us warm.

 

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Romsey Labour on Mill Road

The Romsey Labour team were out on Mill Road today campaigning against the 25% rise in rail fares. It was very very cold but we had the spirit of Labour... Read more

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