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CONTINUING DISCUSSION on PEAK-TIME CONGESTION POINTS and RESIDENT PARKING ZONES.

Bring your queries and thoughts about the PCCP's in Romsey to our stall outside the Coop on Saturday 13th August between 1000 and 1230.

You may also wish to discuss resident parking - there are currently discussions taking place about this and a recommendation is going to be made to Joint Area Committee in October.

13700154_693428887472325_8369581277603877826_n.jpgONE of the visitors to an earlier discussion session used the term a 'virtuous circle' in referring to the net positives of reducing traffic in Romsey - less pollution, safer cycling and walking = fitter population. 

Some residents are concerned that they will be trapped in their homes by the congestion control points - if you have this concern or similar contact me dave.baigent@fitting-in.com 

It is important to understand that the congestion points will only be in operation for a short time in the morning, with the potential for a repeat for a short time in the evening (if necessary).  

There are a number of suggestions coming forward for the location of the PCCP's.  One is to move it to the end of Mill Road, another is that it should be at the junction with Coleridge.  Either of these would reduce the amount of cars that will drive around Romsey, and then park up and walk into town.

There have also been suggestions that the Coldhams Lane PCCP should be moved further down to say Vinery Road to again stop people driving around Romsey looking for somewhere to park.

The anticipation is that the PCCP on Mill Road will be tidal - that is to say stopping traffic coming into Cambridge.  Residents will be able to leave Romsey at all times via Mill Road.

 

Discussion on reducing peak time traffic congestion in Cambridge at Ross Street Community Centre Sunday 24th July 1300 - 1700

At a well attended meeting residents were able to ask questions and make their thoughts known to Romsey Councillors.

  • The overwhelming consensus was that PCCP were a good idea.
  • The majority of people thought that the PCCP on Mill Rd would be better placed on Mill Rd just after the junction with Coleridge.  
  • Consensus was that the Mill Road Rd PCCP should be tidal to allow people to leave Romsey via Mill Rd.
  • Majority in favour of further consideration of blue badge usage

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During Peak times traffic congestion and pollution are seriously affecting Cambridge residents.  The City Deal provides money to help with this and a survey is under way to consider two proposals to reduce the amount of vehicles travelling into and across the city and promote walking, cycling and buses as an alternative by  the use of  Peak Time Congestion Control Points (PCCP) and a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL).

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Probably two of the PTCP are going to provide the greatest advantage for Romsey residents.  Situated on Mill Road and Coldhams Lane, they will stop most inbound traffic, reduce pollution, and free up these roads for cyclists and buses. 

Arguably, PTCP on Mill Road should only need to operate in the morning and be tidal to stop incoming city bound traffic.

There is a suggestion that rather than be on Mill Road Bridge the PCCP should be at the junction with Coleridge Rd to prevent traffic coming into a significant part of Romsey during rush hour.  It is also worth consideration as to if the Coldhams Lane PCCP should move down towards Vinery Road.

peaktimecongestioncontrolpoints.jpeg

The precise location of these points is subject of the discussion and Romsey needs to ensure that no one is trapped in their home, or subject to rat running.

Romsey Labour party has arranged a public exhibition with the opportunity to discuss these measures on Sunday 27th July between 1100 and 1500 at Ross Street Community Centre

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The City Deal WEBSITE and the link to the consultation

THERE ARE ALSO  OTHER EXHIBITIONS  

There is also an online booklet and questionnaire  

 

Parking

Another discussion that Romsey should also be part of will be the question of parking.  There is currently a revue of resident parking schemes taking place.  Potentially this will increase the amount of resident parking zones.  If these go ahead, the knock on affect of this will be that areas without parking zones will be subject to displacement parking.  Romsey should therefore be part of this debate and we should also consider if we want to prevent commuters from using Romsey as a final stopping place for their journey into the city.  This can also be discussed at the Romsey Exhibition.

 

For further details contact your local councillors 

 

CONTINUING DISCUSSION on PEAK CONGESTION CONTROL POINTS

CONTINUING DISCUSSION on PEAK-TIME CONGESTION POINTS and RESIDENT PARKING ZONES. Bring your queries and thoughts about the PCCP's in Romsey to our stall outside the Coop on Saturday 13th August...

The labour party supported the motion put to the full council held 27-6-16 on devolution and the provision of funding to provide 500 council Homes.  The LibDems did not support the motion nor the proposal to accept funding for 500 Council Homes.

See below for fuller details

 

(9-6-16) TIME TO HAVE YOUR SAY ON DEVOLUTION DEAL

CONSULTATION starts today (8 July) on proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal that would see hundreds of new council homes built in Cambridge.

Residents, businesses, students and other people are being urged to take this opportunity to put forward their views on the proposals.

Cambridge City Council agreed to support the government’s proposals for a deal on 28 June and other councils in the proposed deal area have now also given their support. 

The consultation will run from 8 July to 23 August after which the results will be reviewed and a final decision made by the councils.

The deal would see the transfer of a range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority comprising representatives of the seven councils across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Greater Cambridge Greater Peterborough Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP).

The creation of an elected mayor is also a part of the devolution deal proposals. This mayor would chair the combined authority and all residents in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough would be able to vote to elect them.

The devolution deal would include two new funding streams that would hasten the delivery of affordable housing:

 

  1. £70million over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ which the council would spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis. The city council would use some £10million of this fund to replace any of the 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy scheme. 

  2. A further £100million affordable housing fund over five years for affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area, with a mix of tenures including affordable rented and low cost home ownership. In recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult housing market conditions, a substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area with delivery of the homes likely to be through housing associations;

 

There would also be a new £20million annual fund for the next 30 years (£600million) to support economic growth, development of local infrastructure and jobs.

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “We support the devolution deal for many reasons, but the biggest by far is the extra funding for new affordable housing for rent.

“We negotiated hard and won agreement to millions of pounds to build at least 500 new council homes in Cambridge plus hundreds of extra additional housing association rental homes for Greater Cambridge, helping councils to take big strides forward in tackling the massive local housing affordability crisis.

“It’s really important that local people, organisations and businesses take a hard look at what is being put forward and use the consultation to tell us what they think - I would urge everyone to take this opportunity to put their point of view across by the August deadline.

“All of the comments we receive back will be considered by councils in the autumn, and by the new national government team, whose clear support will also be vital before the devolution deal can be confirmed.”

The consultation with lots of supporting information that explains the proposed deal in more depth is available at www.cambridge.gov.uk/devolution.

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors:

 

  1. The deal has been negotiated with government by Cambridge City Council, Cambridgeshire County Council, Peterborough City Council, South Cambridgeshire District Council, Fenland District Council, Huntingdonshire District Council, East Cambridgeshire District Council and The Greater Cambridge Greater Peterborough Enterprise Partnership (LEP).

  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email:lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email:tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email:castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

 

 

(27-6-16) COUNCIL AGREES TO SUPPORT DEVOLUTION DEAL FOR MORE HOMES

CAMBRIDGE City Council has agreed to support the government’s proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal that would see hundreds of new council homes built in Cambridge.

 

At a special meeting of the full council (Monday 27 June) councillors agreed the deal which will also be debated by other councils in the proposed deal area.

 

If the plans are supported by the other councils there will be a consultation with residents and employers from 4 July to 22 August, in advance of any final decision being made.


The deal covers the potential transfer of a wide range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority of the seven councils, across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Local Enterprise Partnership.


The devolution deal proposes two new funding sources to boost the delivery of affordable housing in Greater Cambridge:

 

  1. A £70million fund for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, which  the council will spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis. Some £10million of this fund would be available to the city council to replace any of those 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy scheme. 

  2. A parallel second £100million affordable housing fund over five years to deliver affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area, with a mix of tenures to include affordable rented and low cost home ownership.  A substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area, in recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult housing market conditions. It is likely that delivery would be primarily through housing associations.

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “The devolution deal that we have agreed to support and share for public consultation would bring desperately needed new homes to Cambridge, helping us to ensure that people get the homes they need and deserve and to secure the future growth of the city’s economy.

 

“We have a housing affordability crisis in the city that requires strong action and we have negotiated hard with government to secure millions of pounds for investment in new homes, putting housing at the centre of the devolution deal.”

 

“It will now be for residents and businesses to have their say on the proposals in a public consultation and I would urge everyone to take this opportunity to put their point of view across.

 

“We will consider all of the comments we receive during the consultation, along with those of the new national government leaders, before deciding whether or not to confirm our initial support for the devolution plans.”

 

The deal would also see the creation of an elected mayor to chair the combined authority who would have specific powers, particularly over transport.

 

Ends

 

Notes for editors:

 

 

  1. 1.     ‘Cambridge Housing Fund’ within the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Devolution Plan Subject to agreement on the devolution deal. Detail below agreed between Cambridge City Council and the government, also working with the seven council Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution team:

 

  • £70m grant to be made available to Cambridge City Council, for it to use to build new council housing. 

  • At least £60m of the grant to deliver the 500 new council homes in Cambridge by the city council will spend the grant over a five year period on social rented homes(defined as rents at Local Housing Allowance levels). 

  • £10m of the grant will be available to the city council to replace any of the 500 homes subsequently sold through the Right to Buy. 

  • The city council will combine the funding with Right to Buy receipts in its control. 

 

  • The city council has already identified potential sites and will develop a detailed delivery plan.

  • The new housing will be owned and managed through the council’s Housing Revenue Account (HRA) and will be let as secure local authority tenancies.

  • Delivery of the new homes will be undertaken in close liaison with South Cambridgeshire District Council in relation to their complementary affordable housing programme and through the Greater Cambridge Housing Development Agency, the shared housing delivery vehicle operated by the two Councils.
     
  • The city council will have the freedom to choose the extent that it provides the new homes on land that it owns or land owned by others (including through section 106 planning agreements).

  • The grant will be made available to the city council through the new Combined Authority. 

  • The grant is separate and in addition to a £100m affordable housing grant in the Devolution Agreement for non-council Cambridgeshire and Peterborough housing for affordable rent and shared ownership housing to be provided via housing associations, including a particular focus on delivering this in South Cambridgeshire and Greater Cambridge.

  • Issues relating to government plans for ‘higher value sales’, affecting Cambridge council housing, were not addressed in the devolution discussions and will be the subject of further discussion between the Government and councils, including with Cambridge City Council.



  1. Reports presented to council committees are available on the council’s website:http://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/ieDocHome.aspx;

  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email:lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email:tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email:castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

 

Cambridge News three articles one and two and three

The Devolution Document from Government to be considered in public by Full Council 27th June 1800 Guild Hall.

 

The Press Release  17 June, 2016

CAMBRIDGE City Council will consider the government’s proposals for a new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough devolution deal at a special meeting of the full council on Monday 27 June at 6pm.     lewisherbert.jpg

Along with a Peterborough City Council meeting that evening, these will be the first of seven council meetings to decide on devolution and a new mayor.

If the plans are supported by the councils, there would be a July to September consultation with residents and employers across the city before any final decision is made on the deal.

The proposed deal covers the potential transfer of a wide range of resources and powers for infrastructure, housing, economic development, employment and skills from the government to a combined authority of the seven councils, across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and the Local Enterprise Partnership.

It also proposes the creation of an elected mayor to chair the combined authority who would have specific powers, particularly over transport.

The devolution deal proposes two new funding sources to boost the delivery of affordable housing in Greater Cambridge:

More follows

  • £70million fund for a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ over five years, ring-fenced to the city council, which  the council will spend on its plans for over 500 new council homes to help tackle the city’s housing affordability crisis.
    (see bullet point summary also attached)
  • A parallel second £100m affordable housing fund over five years to deliver affordable homes across the proposed combined authority area with a mix of tenures to include affordable rented and low cost home ownership.  A substantial proportion of this funding would be directed at the Greater Cambridge area, in recognition of its high levels of growth and difficult  housing market conditions. It is likely that delivery would be primarily through housing associations.

Cllr Lewis Herbert, Leader of Cambridge City Council, said: “It was vital for us that the discussion on a devolution deal was on this more local geography to give Cambridge a say and its challenges priority, and we welcome the fact that the strength of our case has been recognised in the revised proposals. 

“Alongside proposinging genuine devolution opportunities based on the Greater Cambridge/ Greater Peterborough area, the focus of our work, and at the centre of the Council’s decision a week Monday, will be the city’s housing affordability crisis and the need for new council housing in Cambridge recognised in a ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’, and in the second, wider affordable housing investment plan for in housing association projects in Greater Cambridge and across the county.”

Commenting on the ‘Cambridge Housing Plan’ in the proposed deal, Cllr Kevin Price, Executive Councillor for Housing, said: “In our discussions with government we have always been clear that the city council’s priority is to have the freedoms and funding to tackle the housing affordability crisis that threatens to limit Cambridge’s future growth and success, and secure the future viability of council housing for our tenants

 

More follows

“Our detailed analysis of the housing market in Cambridge has enabled us to provide the government with convincing evidence of the important role social rented housing can play in addressing the housing needs of the city, to enable and sustain its growth, which is also vital to the national economy.

“This fund, if agreed by the full Council, would enable the city council to start on the largest council house building programme in Cambridge in the last 40 years. It would provide hundreds of badly needed high quality new homes at truly affordable rent levels for those who live and work in Cambridge.

“Over time, the rent from these new homes will also enable us to invest in further house building. The debate with all councillors a week Monday will rightly cover all aspects of the devolution deal offer but I am pleased that our strong defence of council housing has resulted in a very favourable housing offer.”

Ends

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What Cambridge Evening News has to say

Notes for editors:

 release website

 

  1. Reports presented to council committees are available on the council’s website: http://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/ieDocHome.aspx;
  2. Contacts

 

Cllr Lewis Herbert (Labour group), Leader of Cambridge City Council, email: lewis.herbert@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 07748 536153

 

Cllr Tim Bick (Liberal Democrat group), Opposition spokesperson, email: tim.bick@btinternet.com, tel: 07720 413173

 

Cllr John Hipkin, (Independent/ Green group), Opposition spokesperson, email: castleindependent@gmail.com, tel: 01223 564126

 

Antoinette Jackson, Chief Executive, email: antoinette.jackson@cambridge.gov.uk, tel: 01223 457001

Cambridge City Council vote to consult on the proposal

The labour party supported the motion put to the full council held 27-6-16 on devolution and the provision of funding to provide 500 council Homes.  The LibDems did not support...

Just had a very interesting meeting to hear about this exciting project which is starting right now in Romsey.

If anyone would like to help out then please contact

Susie Talbot 01223 699838 daat@cambridgeshire.gov.uk

George Davidson 01223 576874 ged251@yahoo.co.uk

 

 front_page.jpg

 

A new café will be opening on Mill Road later this year. Planning permission has been given, and building work is due to start in July. The cafe will occupy a building specially converted for its new use, and will incorporate a meeting room which will be available for both commercial and community groups to use.

One aim is to provide a safe and supportive space for those who are stable and motivated in recovery from drug or alcohol misuse to meet, volunteer, work and continue to empower their recovery journey; the other to provide a commercially viable business which will operate as part of the neighbourhood and as a community resource. The Hub café is a joint initiative between the service user community, Cambridgeshire DAAT Team led by Susie Talbot, and the treatment provider INCLUSION led by Paul Pescud; it will be a visible, active, public facing demonstration of the possibility of recovery; it will allow both the wider community and professionals to share skills, training, to host events for music, spoken word, art and IT access.

The design of the café has been led by local architect George Davidson who has made a significant contribution of professional work and is a keen supporter of the project:

‘I am passionate about the power of recovery from the misuse of drugs or alcohol and about this project; it is the most socially worthwhile project I have been involved with in a professional career spanning 37 years and I feel privileged to be a part of it. Although I run a busy architects practice, much of my life is now given to working with the Cambridgeshire drug and alcohol service, where I see lives being transformed through the passion of Susie Talbot, Paul Pescud and their teams. The first Recovery Café, 'THE BRINK', was opened by the Duchess of Cambridge in 2011 in Liverpool; since then, recovery hubs have been steadily emerging across the UK, driven in part by a public demand for sober and clean environments. This will be a great project for Cambridge; Public Health England thinks so and has given £100,000 to start it off. What we need now is another £55,000 to complete the building and open the cafe, so please help us'.

The service user involvement includes former service user Gem Blackburn who now runs her own consultancy ‘View from the edge’:

‘Nearly 13 years ago I stopped using heroin & crack, I had no idea how to live a life without drugs, I was lost, alone, desperate & angry. One of most important things that saved me and continues to keep me sane is the company of other recovering addicts. Those wonderful people encouraged me to value myself, empowered and encouraged me to help

others; they taught me how to be a better human. The Hub Café will offer us a place to belong, to be who we are, wherever we are on our journeys whilst giving recovery a visible forum within our local community. Recovery is not just about an individual, it's ripples spread further, family, friends, employers, one recovery seeds so many stories. We've made an amazing start so please support us to make our dream a reality'.

The café is being championed by the DAAT Co-ordinator Susie Talbot:

'This started as a vision over 2 years ago to fill a gap in our service, to help sustain long term recovery. In Cambridgeshire we have developed a team of 'recovery champions', individuals with lived experience, who work with us as volunteers and provide peer support; the Hub will provide a great opportunity to capture their energy and enthusiasm, and to gradually enable service users to take ownership of their business and lives'.

The café has been established as a Community Interest Company which is a form of social enterprise.

We have been moved and delighted by the offers of help and goodwill which the café has already attracted and we need to build on this to make the café a success. We are ambitious and intend to succeed. There is a huge skill set within the recovery community, ranging from professional and commercial experience in catering and management, through to bags of enthusiasm and a desire to make this work and a willingness to learn new skills; we are harnessing these.

The overwhelming view is that this is an important, worthwhile, correctly located, socially responsible, altruistic and philanthropic project for Cambridge, and we would therefore urge you all to give it the support it deserves and needs.

YOU CAN HELP. We need to provide kitchen and cafe equipment and furniture, as well as the outside seating area.

Any donations, particularly financial, would be welcome; all donors will be thanked personally, and recognised on a special plaque to be on permanent display in the cafe.

If you are able to help us, or want to find out more about us and the project, please contact:

Susie Talbot 01223 699838 daat@cambridgeshire.gov.uk

George Davidson 01223 576874 ged251@yahoo.co.uk

The Hub Café Steering Group. June 2016.

Susie Talbot, Paul Pescud, Tom Jefford, Lara Watkins, Gem Blackburn, Russell Bowyer, George Davidson.

 

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THE HUB CAFE: Brookfields, Mill Road, Romsey

Just had a very interesting meeting to hear about this exciting project which is starting right now in Romsey. If anyone would like to help out then please contact Susie...

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